American Trio Ready to Climb K6 in Pakistan + Baintha Brak West NE Buttress Attempt +

Pakistan – American Trio getting ready to climb K6 – from
Baintha Brak West (6540m) N.E. Buttress attempt – from Mountain.ru English

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https://www.montagna.tv/166842/pakistan-trio-americano-tenta-lascesa-del-k6/ — American Trio getting ready to climb K6

http://mountain.ru/article/article_display1.php?article_id=8919 — Baintha Brakk West (6540m) N.E.Buttress attempt.

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Pakistan – American Trio getting ready to climb K6 – from

Baintha Brak West (6540m) N.E. Buttress attempt – from Mountain.ru English

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https://www.montagna.tv/166842/pakistan-trio-americano-tenta-lascesa-del-k6/ — American Trio getting ready to climb K6

http://mountain.ru/article/article_display1.php?article_id=8919 — Baintha Brakk West (6540m) N.E.Buttress attempt.

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NH 4K: Mount Jefferson via Castle Ravine, Gulfside, The Cornice, Castle Trail

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Lauren and I don't get out to the Presidentials all that much. Most of the reasoning is distance to home, but crowds play a little bit of a role in it too, especially in the era of Covid. Every time we do make the trip, we have ourselves a little fun.
We were going back and forth between Castle Ravine/Castle and Caps Ridge, and settled for the former due to its longer length and full value day potential.

We commenced our day just prior to 8 AM at the Castle Trail trailhead, an early start for two people who like to sleep in on weekends.

The terrain can only be described as gentle with moderate gains over the first several miles. Although there are quite a few river crossings, all were manageable given that we are currently in a drought. There's no doubt some of them would be trickier in a higher water year.

Waterfalls, waterfalls, and more waterfalls was our early day mantra. But that would change quick once the elevation gains started about four mil..

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Lauren and I don't get out to the Presidentials all that much. Most of the reasoning is distance to home, but crowds play a little bit of a role in it too, especially in the era of Covid. Every time we do make the trip, we have ourselves a little fun.
We were going back and forth between Castle Ravine/Castle and Caps Ridge, and settled for the former due to its longer length and full value day potential.


We commenced our day just prior to 8 AM at the Castle Trail trailhead, an early start for two people who like to sleep in on weekends.


The terrain can only be described as gentle with moderate gains over the first several miles. Although there are quite a few river crossings, all were manageable given that we are currently in a drought. There's no doubt some of them would be trickier in a higher water year.




Waterfalls, waterfalls, and more waterfalls was our early day mantra. But that would change quick once the elevation gains started about four miles into our trek.







At some point during the ascent, we reached Roof Rock, an aptly named landmark that one has to crawl under. It's also the beginning of the 'REAL' ascent that we had been waiting for.






The Castle Ravine was as advertised in a sense, but a little overblown in another. Scrambling up big, sometimes loose rocks, we climbed higher and higher. Surely, it is not the ideal descent route relative to the Castle Trail, but it isn't a sheer cliff akin to Huntington Ravine, which you surely do not want to descend. I wouldn't advise descending Castle Ravine in wet weather, but it is not terribly exposed.



When we reached the saddle, we began the ascent up the Gulfside Trail. Our plan was to tag some of the Cornice for my quest to complete all the trails in the Whites. It was about a 45 minute detour, but we got to spend some additional time soaking in the great views.






Eventually we reached the junction with the Caps Ridge Trail and passed more people than we had all day on the way up to the summit. The Castle Ravine Trail was completely empty that morning except for us.


From the summit, we headed down the Castle Trail to complete the loop. Despite its annoying ups and downs, this was my favorite trail of the day. The views were spectacular, and once we finally made it over the "castles," we were graced with a very nice trail with good footing that made for a simple descent.








Overall, this was a classic loop that every White Mountains hiker should experience. Its exposure is not Huntington Ravine worthy, and I prefer the Six Husbands Trail (but not the Six Husbands approach), but this one is a keeper.


Total Time: 7 hrs 42 minsTotal Distance: ~12 miles (Garmin Fenix 5x Plus, probably more though)Total Elevation Gain: ~4635 vertical gain

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Check Direct on Punta Ferrario in Val Masino Freed + 10 Facts about Mt Everest’s Mountaineers + K6 (7282m) Attempt

Czech Direct on Punta Ferrario in Val Masino freed – from PlanetMountain.com
10 Facts about Mt Everest's Mountaineers – from SnowBrains.com
Colin Haley, Jeff and Preti Wright will attempt K6 (7282m) – from Desnivel.com -English Translation
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New Page on Personal Websites in the General Section of the Forum at Summitpost.org
https://www.summitpost.org/phpBB3/personal-websites-t71571-1650.html
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https://www.planetmountain.com/en/news/ … gallo.html — Czech Direct on Punta Ferrario in Val Masino freed by Marazzi and Regallo.
https://snowbrains.com/10-facts-about-m … untaineers — 10 Facts about Mount Everest's mountaineers.
https://www.desnivel.com/expediciones/c … 6-7-282-m/ — Colin Haley, Jeff and Preti Wright will attempt K6 (7282m)

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Czech Direct on Punta Ferrario in Val Masino freed – from PlanetMountain.com

10 Facts about Mt Everest's Mountaineers – from SnowBrains.com

Colin Haley, Jeff and Preti Wright will attempt K6 (7282m) – from Desnivel.com -English Translation

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New Page on Personal Websites in the General Section of the Forum at Summitpost.org

https://www.summitpost.org/phpBB3/personal-websites-t71571-1650.html

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https://www.planetmountain.com/en/news/ … gallo.html — Czech Direct on Punta Ferrario in Val Masino freed by Marazzi and Regallo.
https://snowbrains.com/10-facts-about-m … untaineers — 10 Facts about Mount Everest's mountaineers.
https://www.desnivel.com/expediciones/c … 6-7-282-m/ — Colin Haley, Jeff and Preti Wright will attempt K6 (7282m)

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Rayburn Trails AKA Colton Road Conservation Area (Millbury, MA)

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Writing about my local trails lately has been a fun endeavor. It makes exploring new areas more worthwhile when I can share the journey with others who may want to go themselves!

The Rayburn Trails are a series of mountain bike trails in a deeply residential area of Millbury. It seems improbable that someone had the resources and drive to create an expansive system in such a small area of land, but it's been said that the system could have up to 10 miles of trail. I think it's less than that, but it's a formidable area to explore on bike or on foot.

It's all very windy, tight single track for the most part, although there are some wider trails outside of the main area that are more suitable for being on foot as opposed to being on a mountain bike. Once I fix my bike, I will be back to explore!

Total Time: ~45 minutesTotal Distance: ~3 miles, with road run (Garmin Fenix 5x Plus, very likely an inaccurate distance)Total Elevation Gain: ~288 ..

Follow me on Facebook!
Writing about my local trails lately has been a fun endeavor. It makes exploring new areas more worthwhile when I can share the journey with others who may want to go themselves!

The Rayburn Trails are a series of mountain bike trails in a deeply residential area of Millbury. It seems improbable that someone had the resources and drive to create an expansive system in such a small area of land, but it's been said that the system could have up to 10 miles of trail. I think it's less than that, but it's a formidable area to explore on bike or on foot.

It's all very windy, tight single track for the most part, although there are some wider trails outside of the main area that are more suitable for being on foot as opposed to being on a mountain bike. Once I fix my bike, I will be back to explore!



Total Time: ~45 minutesTotal Distance: ~3 miles, with road run (Garmin Fenix 5x Plus, very likely an inaccurate distance)Total Elevation Gain: ~288 vertical gain

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Colin Haley on K6 Pakistan + Buck Mountain Tetons T/R + Granite Peak Fatality – Montana

Himalayan and Karakorum Update – Colin Haley on K6 (PK) and More. – Explorersweb.com
Buck Mountain – Tetons – Wyoming – Trip report with pictures from SnowBrains.com
One climber dead, two injured in separate Granite Peak incidents – Montana – Summitpost.org
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https://explorersweb.com/2020/09/08/himalayan-update-colin-haley-on-k6-and-more/ — Himalayan and Karakorum Update – Colin Haley on K6 , and More.

https://snowbrains.com/trip-report-buck-mountain1/ — Tetons – WY — Buck Mountain – WY – Trip report with pictures

https://www.kbzk.com/news/montana-news/one-dead-two-injured-in-two-separate-granite-peak-incidents — One climber dead, two injured in separate Granite Peak incidents – Montana

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Himalayan and Karakorum Update – Colin Haley on K6 (PK) and More. – Explorersweb.com
Buck Mountain – Tetons – Wyoming – Trip report with pictures from SnowBrains.com
One climber dead, two injured in separate Granite Peak incidents – Montana – Summitpost.org
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https://explorersweb.com/2020/09/08/himalayan-update-colin-haley-on-k6-and-more/ — Himalayan and Karakorum Update – Colin Haley on K6 , and More.
Image may contain: mountain, cloud, sky, outdoor and nature


https://snowbrains.com/trip-report-buck-mountain1/ — Tetons – WY — Buck Mountain – WY – Trip report with pictures
Trip Report: Buck Mountain - SnowBrains


https://www.kbzk.com/news/montana-news/one-dead-two-injured-in-two-separate-granite-peak-incidents — One climber dead, two injured in separate Granite Peak incidents – Montana
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N Eiger First Free Ascent + Luna Peak True Summit + 50 Hikers Trapped in Sierra N.F. Fire

North of the Eiger, First free ascent for Roger Schaeli – from Montaga.tv ( English Translation )
Luna Peak – Standard Route – True Summit – N. Cascades – WA – Trip report with pictures
50 Hikers trapped in Sierra National Forest as Creek Fire blocks escape routes – Snow Brains
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https://www.montagna.tv/166765/nord-del … ci-la-vie/ — North of the Eiger, First free ascent for Roger Schaeli.

https://cascadeclimbers.com/forum/topic/103652-tr-luna-peak-standard-route-true-summit-09052020/ — Luna Peak — Standard Route – True Summit – N Cascades – WA
https://snowbrains.com/creek-fire-traps … alifornia/ — 50 Hikers trapped in Sierra National Forest as Creek Fire blocks escape routes.
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North of the Eiger, First free ascent for Roger Schaeli – from Montaga.tv ( English Translation )
Luna Peak – Standard Route – True Summit – N. Cascades – WA – Trip report with pictures
50 Hikers trapped in Sierra National Forest as Creek Fire blocks escape routes – Snow Brains
——————————————————————————————–
https://www.montagna.tv/166765/nord-del … ci-la-vie/ — North of the Eiger, First free ascent for Roger Schaeli.

roger schaeli, nina caprez


https://cascadeclimbers.com/forum/topic/103652-tr-luna-peak-standard-route-true-summit-09052020/ — Luna Peak — Standard Route – True Summit – N Cascades – WA
https://snowbrains.com/creek-fire-traps … alifornia/ — 50 Hikers trapped in Sierra National Forest as Creek Fire blocks escape routes.
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White River National Forest: Sapphire Point Trail (Blog Hike #819)

Trail: Sapphire Point Trail
Hike Location: White River National Forest, Swan Mountain Recreation Area
Geographic Location: east of Frisco, CO (39.58725, -106.04393)
Length: 0.7 miles
Difficulty: 1/10 (Easy)
Last Hiked: July 2020
Overview: A short gently rolling loop with great views of Dillon Reservoir.
Area Information: https://www.fs.usda.gov/recarea/whiteriver/recarea/?recid=40879
Hike Route Map: https://www.mappedometer.com/?maproute=825279
Summary Video: (coming October 2)
Photo Highlight:
Directions to the trailhead: In central Colorado, take I-70 to SR 9 (exit 203). Exit and go south on SR 9. Drive SR 9 south 3.6 miles to Swan Mountain Road and turn left on Swan Mountain Rd. The signed roadside parking area for Sapphire Point Overlook is located 1.9 miles ahead on the left.
The hike: Sprawling for 2.3 million acres on the west side of Colorado's Continental Divide, White River National Forest is America's most visited national forest. The forest was established in 1891 as the White River Plateau Timber Reserve, the second timber reserve in the United States. The forest contains 8 wilderness areas and several developed areas of regional fame, including the Maroon Bells Scenic Area, the Vail Pass Winter Recreation Area, and the Historic Crystal Mill mining site. White River National Forest's Swan Mountain Recreation Area does not have the fame of some of the forest's other areas, but it protects some steep and scenic terrain on the north side of its namesake mountain. Paved bike trails start from the nearby towns of Frisco and Dillon and lead up the side of Swan Mountain, and they provide access to Sapphire Point, the location of this short hike. The views of Dillon Reservoir and the mountains beyond make Sapphire Point a popular destination. In fact, the small roadside parking lot was nearly full on the late July morning I came here. Thus, the bike paths give an alternate non-motorized way to reach this trailhead during the summer.Trailhead at Sapphire Point The loop goes both directions from the parking lot, but I started on the trail that leaves the big map board on the left (west) side of the parking area, thus hiking the loop clockwise. The wide dirt trail quickly arrives at Sapphire Point's main overlook. This view looks southwest across the Blue River arm of Dillon Reservoir, and ridge-like Ophir Mountain stands off in the distance. This overlook was a very popular spot on my visit, and I also saw a large number of chipmunks begging for bites to eat here.
View from main overlook Many people just walk out to the overlook, but the trail curves right at the overlook to continue its loop. The sidehill trail heads east across Swan Mountain's steep north face, which features a moderately dense forest of lodgepole pines. More nice views unfold to the north, and they feature the snow-capped peaks of Chief Mountain and Buffalo Mountain.
Hiking sidehill trail
View from picnic area
At 0.35 miles, you reach a small picnic area that offers northward views across the length of Dillon Reservoir to Ptarmigan Mountain. This picnic area is only accessible by trail, but there were several groups here on my visit. The bike path coming up from Dillon comes in view downhill to the left as the trail curves right. Too soon you return to the parking area to complete the hike.

Trail: Sapphire Point Trail
Hike Location: White River National Forest, Swan Mountain Recreation Area
Geographic Location: east of Frisco, CO (39.58725, -106.04393)
Length: 0.7 miles
Difficulty: 1/10 (Easy)
Last Hiked: July 2020
Overview: A short gently rolling loop with great views of Dillon Reservoir.
Area Information: https://www.fs.usda.gov/recarea/whiteriver/recarea/?recid=40879
Hike Route Map: https://www.mappedometer.com/?maproute=825279
Summary Video: (coming October 2)
Photo Highlight:
Directions to the trailhead: In central Colorado, take I-70 to SR 9 (exit 203). Exit and go south on SR 9. Drive SR 9 south 3.6 miles to Swan Mountain Road and turn left on Swan Mountain Rd. The signed roadside parking area for Sapphire Point Overlook is located 1.9 miles ahead on the left.
The hike: Sprawling for 2.3 million acres on the west side of Colorado's Continental Divide, White River National Forest is America's most visited national forest. The forest was established in 1891 as the White River Plateau Timber Reserve, the second timber reserve in the United States. The forest contains 8 wilderness areas and several developed areas of regional fame, including the Maroon Bells Scenic Area, the Vail Pass Winter Recreation Area, and the Historic Crystal Mill mining site. White River National Forest's Swan Mountain Recreation Area does not have the fame of some of the forest's other areas, but it protects some steep and scenic terrain on the north side of its namesake mountain. Paved bike trails start from the nearby towns of Frisco and Dillon and lead up the side of Swan Mountain, and they provide access to Sapphire Point, the location of this short hike. The views of Dillon Reservoir and the mountains beyond make Sapphire Point a popular destination. In fact, the small roadside parking lot was nearly full on the late July morning I came here. Thus, the bike paths give an alternate non-motorized way to reach this trailhead during the summer.

Trailhead at Sapphire Point

The loop goes both directions from the parking lot, but I started on the trail that leaves the big map board on the left (west) side of the parking area, thus hiking the loop clockwise. The wide dirt trail quickly arrives at Sapphire Point's main overlook. This view looks southwest across the Blue River arm of Dillon Reservoir, and ridge-like Ophir Mountain stands off in the distance. This overlook was a very popular spot on my visit, and I also saw a large number of chipmunks begging for bites to eat here.

View from main overlook

Many people just walk out to the overlook, but the trail curves right at the overlook to continue its loop. The sidehill trail heads east across Swan Mountain's steep north face, which features a moderately dense forest of lodgepole pines. More nice views unfold to the north, and they feature the snow-capped peaks of Chief Mountain and Buffalo Mountain.

Hiking sidehill trail

View from picnic area

At 0.35 miles, you reach a small picnic area that offers northward views across the length of Dillon Reservoir to Ptarmigan Mountain. This picnic area is only accessible by trail, but there were several groups here on my visit. The bike path coming up from Dillon comes in view downhill to the left as the trail curves right. Too soon you return to the parking area to complete the hike.

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CDT Day 73 – Leaving Rawlins

Date: 9/4/20

Daily Miles: 25

Total Miles: 1325

We ended up taking an unplanned zero day on Rawlins. As we looked at the weather forecast, we saw that there is a winter storm coming early next week. We had already been planning to take a rest day in our next town stop (Encampment), but with the storm, that would have been pushed out to two days. Instead of taking two zero days in Encampment, we decided to spread them out and do one in Rawlins and one in Encampment.

So, we got to relax all day yesterday. We enjoyed our time in Rawlins and found the folks very friendly. We had several people at the grocery store and at McDonald’s ask if we were hiking the CDT and wish us well.

Leaving Rawlins this morning, the main focus was on water. We headed out into our longest waterless stretch of the trail…32 miles. Between us, we were carrying 11 liters of water. Our packs felt quite heavy with the water and four days of food.

As we got out of town, we contemplated whether to walk the officia..

Date: 9/4/20

Daily Miles: 25

Total Miles: 1325

We ended up taking an unplanned zero day on Rawlins. As we looked at the weather forecast, we saw that there is a winter storm coming early next week. We had already been planning to take a rest day in our next town stop (Encampment), but with the storm, that would have been pushed out to two days. Instead of taking two zero days in Encampment, we decided to spread them out and do one in Rawlins and one in Encampment.

So, we got to relax all day yesterday. We enjoyed our time in Rawlins and found the folks very friendly. We had several people at the grocery store and at McDonald’s ask if we were hiking the CDT and wish us well.

Leaving Rawlins this morning, the main focus was on water. We headed out into our longest waterless stretch of the trail…32 miles. Between us, we were carrying 11 liters of water. Our packs felt quite heavy with the water and four days of food.

As we got out of town, we contemplated whether to walk the official CDT or an alternate (from Jonathon Leys’s maps) which would knock about 20 miles off this next stretch. The downside of the alternate is that it is completely on paved road…36 miles. Yuck. Plus, it would miss our first water source, so our 32 mile water carry would turn into a 41 mile water carry.

Based on the water alone, we decided to walk the official CDT. About 15 miles into the day, the trail and the road came within a half mile of each other. At that same point, there was a water cache that still had a bit of water in it. We decided at that point, to take enough water from the cache (another 2L each) so that we could take the road alternate. That will ensure that we can make it to Encampment before the winter storm arrives.

It was incredibly hot today. What a difference from just a few days ago when we were chilled all day on the trail. There was rarely a breeze, so we just felt like we were being baked by the sun all day. It feels like this area is all about extreme temperatures…either very cold or very hot.

The road we are walking on was just paved for the first time two years ago. Given that, we have been surprised by the amount of traffic. There is usually a car passing every ten minutes or less.

We stopped to make dinner when we saw a culvert where we could go to find some shade. We realized that the culvert was the perfect spot for sleeping tonight, but we wanted to make more miles today, so we left there and hoped for another culvert down the road.

As we were walking, we saw a cooler on the other side of the road. We walked over to check it out and saw a sign that there was water for bikers and walkers. We each drank down a small bottle of water from the cooler. We immediately felt better with the extra fluids. We are trying to make sure we drink a liter for every six miles we walk, but with the heat, that doesn’t always feel like enough.

We were lucky to find another culvert for sleeping tonight. We had hoped to walk another mile or so, but when we saw the culvert, we decided to stop. Luckily the cars going by over us are not very loud, and there aren’t many cars.

We are planning to get up in the dark tomorrow morning. We’d like to get as many road miles done in the cool morning air as possible. It is supposed to be just as hot tomorrow as it was today.

Defunct picnic area turned shooting range
Defunct picnic area turned shooting range

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CDT Day 74 – Out of the Basin

Date: 9/5/20

Daily Miles: 25

Total Miles: 1350

Today felt like a marathon day.

We got up in the dark this morning. We had thought that it was going to be a warm night, but it seemed that our culvert turned into a wind tunnel and it was quite cold. Once we were walking on the road, it didn’t feel nearly as cold as it was in the culvert.

We were woken up before our alarm by coyotes which sounded quite close. We both had the thought race through our minds that we hoped the coyotes didn’t use the culvert to cross under the road. Luckily they didn’t come any closer, but they were very loud way too early.

As we started walking, we got to see the nighttime stars for about twenty minutes before we could see the horizon turning colors for the sunrise. It was pretty cool to be out walking at that time to see the sky change from night to day.

We expected the day to get pretty hot, which is why we started walking in the dark. Even by 7:30am, we could feel it starting to get hot. When it is..

Date: 9/5/20

Daily Miles: 25

Total Miles: 1350

Today felt like a marathon day.

We got up in the dark this morning. We had thought that it was going to be a warm night, but it seemed that our culvert turned into a wind tunnel and it was quite cold. Once we were walking on the road, it didn’t feel nearly as cold as it was in the culvert.

We were woken up before our alarm by coyotes which sounded quite close. We both had the thought race through our minds that we hoped the coyotes didn’t use the culvert to cross under the road. Luckily they didn’t come any closer, but they were very loud way too early.

As we started walking, we got to see the nighttime stars for about twenty minutes before we could see the horizon turning colors for the sunrise. It was pretty cool to be out walking at that time to see the sky change from night to day.

We expected the day to get pretty hot, which is why we started walking in the dark. Even by 7:30am, we could feel it starting to get hot. When it is hot that early, you know you’re in for a scorcher of a day. In fact, it ended up being about ninety degrees today.

We managed to finish up our road walk by noon and reconnect back into the CDT. Our feet were glad to be done with the paved road…luckily no lasting pain in our feet. We were also glad to finally see trees again! And once we were back on trail, we were even walking in the trees! Yeah! After a week of no trees, it felt really good to walk in the shade of trees again.

By mid-afternoon, we finally came to our first natural water source since leaving Rawlins. We were down to our final sips of water (and the water in our bottles was hot from the sun), so we were grateful to find some clear and very cold water. We sat down in the shade for a long break and drank some of our new water.

We realized that we were closer to our next town stop than we had expected. In fact, it looked like we would have no problem getting into Encampment tomorrow instead of the day after. We will still plan to wait out the winter storm in town, but now we will have an extra rest day.

In our final miles of the day, we ran across two hunters near the trail. Turns out that bow season for elk and deer just started a few days ago. We chatted with them for a few minutes and then headed on to find a place to camp.

We finally made it to camp around 7:00pm…much too long of a day. We set up our tent again for the last time (until the very southern part of New Mexico). While we have appreciated having the tent during the windy nights in the Basin, we will be very happy to go back to our hammocks after Encampment.

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CDT Day 75 – Encampment

Date: 9/6/20

Daily Miles: 13

Total Miles: 1363

Last night was probably our warmest night on the trail. It is pretty crazy to think of the temperature swings in the area. Less than a week ago, we had ice on our tent and in a few days, snow is expected. But this morning was very warm.

We continued to see a lot of hunters today. Most were driving by us in quads or four-wheelers…only one was walking on the trail. We have seen zero elk and only three deer since leaving the Winds. There must be a lot out in the woods though, because there are a lot of hunters coming to this area.

Since we only had 13 miles to hike today and two full rest days ahead of us, we didn’t really feel rushed to get into town today and we took several long breaks in the shade. Also, since we were getting into town a day early, that meant that we had extra food we could eat, so we always seemed to be snacking on something.

We made it down to the road by 1:30pm and started hitching. We only had to wait a few minu..

Date: 9/6/20

Daily Miles: 13

Total Miles: 1363

Last night was probably our warmest night on the trail. It is pretty crazy to think of the temperature swings in the area. Less than a week ago, we had ice on our tent and in a few days, snow is expected. But this morning was very warm.

We continued to see a lot of hunters today. Most were driving by us in quads or four-wheelers…only one was walking on the trail. We have seen zero elk and only three deer since leaving the Winds. There must be a lot out in the woods though, because there are a lot of hunters coming to this area.

Since we only had 13 miles to hike today and two full rest days ahead of us, we didn’t really feel rushed to get into town today and we took several long breaks in the shade. Also, since we were getting into town a day early, that meant that we had extra food we could eat, so we always seemed to be snacking on something.

We made it down to the road by 1:30pm and started hitching. We only had to wait a few minutes before getting a ride. The couple had actually already driven by us, but then turned around and picked us up. We continue to be grateful for all the quick hitches we have gotten this summer.

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