Category: Hiking

Kugler Falls

Short hike to a waterfall in Kugler Woods Preserve.
0.5 miles, surface is rough, rocky, and uphill.

Longer: Drive 10 min for another short hike to Lockatong High Falls.
Longer: From this parking lot, add a hike/bike on the D&R Canal Towpath.
Also Nearby: Ralph Stover and Tohickon Valley; Goat Hill Overlook.

Hike Info:
–Trail Map
–Trail Map 2
–Park info
–Google Map
–Download GPX

Our two cents: Quick waterfall hike along a nice stream, or as a side trip while biking/hiking the D&R Canal Towpath.

As with all waterfalls, best results are in Spring or after rain. Without recent rain there might not be much flow at this one.

Map: Print out ahead but you can also follow our online map.

Books: None that we know of.

Parking: N40.42428° W75.06010°
Large lot along the D&R Canal just north of Bull’s Island.

Restrooms: None at this lot. Try the Bull’s Island Rec. Area park office on Rt. 29, a few miles south of the parking lot.

Hike Directions:
Walk to the south end of parking area and alo..

Kugler Falls is reached by a short hike in Kugler Woods Preserve located in Hunterdon County, New Jersey.
Short hike to a waterfall in Kugler Woods Preserve.

0.5 miles, surface is rough, rocky, and uphill.

Hike Info:

–Trail Map
–Trail Map 2
–Park info
–Google Map
–Download GPX

Our two cents: Quick waterfall hike along a nice stream, or as a side trip while biking/hiking the D&R Canal Towpath.

As with all waterfalls, best results are in Spring or after rain. Without recent rain there might not be much flow at this one.

Map: Print out ahead but you can also follow our online map.

Books: None that we know of.

Parking: N40.42428° W75.06010°
Large lot along the D&R Canal just north of Bull’s Island.

Restrooms: None at this lot. Try the Bull’s Island Rec. Area park office on Rt. 29, a few miles south of the parking lot.




Hike Directions:

Walk to the south end of parking area and along the shoulder a bit.

Cross to the opposite side of Rt. 29 to a wooden trail kiosk. A small cascade may be visible close to the road.

Walk uphill on an unmarked path on the right side of the stream.

At a cut log, turn left to walk down closer to the falls, a series of cascades over a rock drop into a shallow pool of water.

Retrace.

Optional: Back at the main path, turn left and continue a bit see the falls from above before returning.

All photos:

Walk to the south end of the lot
Cross to the other side of Rt 29
Trail kiosk
Casades near the road.
Head uphill on the path
Turn at the cut log to get closer
Kugler Falls
Looking back down the stream while at the falls.
Above the falls
Above the falls

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Hiked: 4/19/19.

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Lockatong High Falls

Short hike to a waterfall cascading over a rocky drop in Lockatong Creek.
1.8 miles, surface is roots and some rocks, and the beginning of the trail may contain deep, thick mud. Mostly level until a brief downhill just before the falls.

Longer: Drive 10 min for another short hike to Kugler Falls.
Nearby: Goat Hill Overlook; Ralph Stover and Tohickon Valley.

Hike Info:
–Trail Map
–Park info
–Google Map
–Download GPX

Our two cents: Decent sized waterfall payoff for a short hike – just be aware that the trail was incredibly muddy for awhile before drying out into a normal trail.

We hiked this after recent rain (the best time to see any waterfall…) so your results may vary on the mud. Conveniently, there was a large puddle in the parking lot to rinse our boots.

Map: Print ahead, nothing at the trailhead.

Books: None that we know of.

Parking: N40.44672° W75.01196°
Rt 519 in Kingwood Township, about 1/4 mile from the Kingwood Township Methodist Church. Long dirt driveway with a few po..


Short hike to a waterfall cascading over a rocky drop in Lockatong Creek.

1.8 miles, surface is roots and some rocks, and the beginning of the trail may contain deep, thick mud. Mostly level until a brief downhill just before the falls.

Hike Info:

–Trail Map
–Park info
–Google Map
–Download GPX

Our two cents: Decent sized waterfall payoff for a short hike – just be aware that the trail was incredibly muddy for awhile before drying out into a normal trail.

We hiked this after recent rain (the best time to see any waterfall…) so your results may vary on the mud. Conveniently, there was a large puddle in the parking lot to rinse our boots.

Map: Print ahead, nothing at the trailhead.

Books: None that we know of.

Parking: N40.44672° W75.01196°
Rt 519 in Kingwood Township, about 1/4 mile from the Kingwood Township Methodist Church. Long dirt driveway with a few pot holes that leads to circular dirt parking lot for the Lockatong WMA.

Restrooms: None and the immediate area is mostly houses/farms.

If coming up Rt. 29 there is the town of Stockton, and Prallsville Mill’s has restrooms back by the D&R Canal Towpath. Further out, Rt 29 also has Bull’s Island Rec. Area park office or the Washington Crossing parking lot.



Hike Directions:

Overview: WHITE out-and-back

0.0 – The trail starts towards the left if your back is to the main road.

Shortly, keep straight, passing a branch of the trail on the right.

——
Note: The map shows the trail is a loop but when we tried going to the right side in the beginning it was so muddy and overgrown we bailed and kept straight to do it out-and-back.
——

Keep following WHITE, possibly through mud, roots, and fallen branches before it turns to a regular trail.

Start to hear the falls as the trail slopes downhill.

0.9 – The falls are below the trail. There’s an area to carefully scramble down for a closer look.

Retrace the route.

Optional: Try taking the other side of the loop back.

All Photos:

Lockatong WMA parking area
Start of the trail
Muddy first section of the trail
Muddy first section of the trail
Rest of the trail was dry
Falls below trail level; small area to scramble down for a closer look.
Looking to the right
Looking to the left
At the end of the hike

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Hiked: 4/19/19.

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National Trails Day – New Jersey

National Trails Day is Saturday, June 1, 2019.The first National Trails day was launched by the American Hiking Society on June 5, 1993.

For hikes, trail cleanups and other National Trails Day events around New Jersey:

NJ Parks and Forests – June 1 Events
National Trails Day – Event Calendar – search by state/zip
NJ Parks and Forests – National Trails Day
For hikes across the country, check the event page of the American Hiking Society’s National Trails Day site.


National Trails Day is Saturday, June 1, 2019
.The first National Trails day was launched by the American Hiking Society on June 5, 1993.

For hikes, trail cleanups and other National Trails Day events around New Jersey:

For hikes across the country, check the event page of the American Hiking Society’s National Trails Day site.

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Cairn Subscription Box for May 2019

What’s inside the Cairn outdoor subscription box for May 2019.
Considering getting a Cairn subscription or giving one as a gift? Here’s a rundown of what this month’s box offers.

Disclaimer: Cairn provided a complimentary box for review, but did not provide compensation or exercise control over the content of this post.

In this month’s box

Value
Trail Hound camping lights
Ambient mood lighting for camp or anywhere outdoors. 30 ft.
$25
Aunt Fannie’s Mosquito Wipes
DEET-free mosquito wipes; lasts up to 4 hours.
$10
Lasting Smiles Lip Balm
Organic, fair trade lip balm. Vanilla Bean.
$10
Peak Sherpa Energy Bites
8 energy bites made with Tsampa barley in a resealable package. Almond butter chocolate chip.
$3

Total Value: $48

This month Cairn is “feeling festive” with outdoor lights, mosquito protection, lip balm, and some energy bites to kick back and enjoy the outdoors.

Trail Hound camping lights
A small coil of flexible wire with usb-powered tiny LED lights.

I saw “30-ft” on the..


What’s inside the Cairn outdoor subscription box for May 2019.

Considering getting a Cairn subscription or giving one as a gift? Here’s a rundown of what this month’s box offers.

Disclaimer: Cairn provided a complimentary box for review, but did not provide compensation or exercise control over the content of this post.

In this month’s box

Value
Trail Hound camping lights Ambient mood lighting for camp or anywhere outdoors. 30 ft. $25
Aunt Fannie’s Mosquito Wipes DEET-free mosquito wipes; lasts up to 4 hours. $10
Lasting Smiles Lip Balm Organic, fair trade lip balm. Vanilla Bean. $10
Peak Sherpa Energy Bites 8 energy bites made with Tsampa barley in a resealable package. Almond butter chocolate chip. $3


Total Value: $48


This month Cairn is “feeling festive” with outdoor lights, mosquito protection, lip balm, and some energy bites to kick back and enjoy the outdoors.

Trail Hound camping lights

A small coil of flexible wire with usb-powered tiny LED lights.

I saw “30-ft” on the 4″ square box and wondered how that could be but it’s really thin. Comes with a dimmer and blinking on/off/speed control.

I plugged it into the Power Practical power charger from the July 2018 Cairn Box which works great. We’ll probably string it around our deck this summer.

Aunt Fannie’s Mosquito Wipes

Repel mosquitos and other biting insects with DEET-free wipes.

We tucked a few of these in our backpacks but haven’t tried them yet. It’s always easier carrying wipe packets than a bottle of spray while on hikes.

Update: Used these mid-hike after we had to remove a layer when it unexpectedly warmed up, so our arms weren’t protected… just as we hit a low-lying buggy area (of course).

They performed well, instantly repelling all the flying nasties for the rest of the hike. We’d consider getting more when we run out.

Lasting Smiles Lip Balm

Moisturizing lip balm using organic and fair trade ingredients. The mild “flavor” reminds me of the instant oatmeal I have sometimes. It goes on smooth but it’s not rated for sun protection… so minor ding there.

Peak Sherpa Energy Bites

Eight tasty energy bites in a resealable package which is terrific if you want to space out your snacks… but as usual we polished them off in one sitting.

Tom scarfed one before I could even get a photo:

These had just the right amount of “chew” to be satisfying but not hard to eat… though we did taste test on warm day.

They are made with Tsampa, a “sprouted and roasted mountain barley” that Sherpas have eaten for ages apparently (this one is new to me and I eat a lot of odd healthy things).

Good flavor without being too sweet or strong, and there was a dusting of nuts or something on them which kept them from being sticky.

I really really liked these and would get again, while Tom was on the fence about them.

The latest specials from Cairn:

The Summer 2019 Obsidian Collection – “Taste The Good Life" features camping cookwear from Primus Equipment, Opinel, and GrubStick, a growler from MiiR, pancakes and syrup from Backpacker's Pantry and Runamok Maple. Limited quantities available!
The Hammock Collection – This curated welcome box includes: Serac Classic Hammock, Serac Straps, Peak Sherpa Energy Bites, Natrapel Wipes. While supplies last!

Find out more about Cairn.

And check out our full review of Cairn.

More run downs:
Cairn – June 2019
Cairn – May 2019
Cairn – April 2019
Cairn – March 2019
Cairn – February 2019
Cairn – January 2019
Cairn – December 2018
Cairn – November 2018
Cairn – October 2018
Cairn – September 2018
Cairn – August 2018
Cairn – July 2018
A Year of Cairn
All reviews…

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OUTXE Cooler Backpack Review

OUTXE’s cooler backpack keeps food and drinks cold while hiking, camping, or heading to the beach.
This insulated cooler backpack from OUTXE can be used to carry drinks and food on a hike, to the beach, boat trips, and more. It features a padded back panel and straps, large front organizer pocket to store plates and utensils, and side bottle pockets.

Disclaimer: OUTXE provided a complimentary cooler backpack for review, but did not provide compensation or exercise control over the content of this post.

The Specs
25L main compartment holds food/drinks for 3-4 people
Fully insulated, leakproof, seamless one-piece PEVA liner
Front pockets for plates, utensils, largest can fit 14″ laptop
Zippered pocket for small items
Side pockets for bottles or umbrella
Adjustable padded straps including waist/chest
Bottom straps for blanket or jacket
Includes waterproof pack cover
The main compartment is insulated and huge, easily fitting drinks and food for four people (specs says it can hold 25 cans..


OUTXE’s cooler backpack keeps food and drinks cold while hiking, camping, or heading to the beach.

This insulated cooler backpack from OUTXE can be used to carry drinks and food on a hike, to the beach, boat trips, and more. It features a padded back panel and straps, large front organizer pocket to store plates and utensils, and side bottle pockets.

Disclaimer: OUTXE provided a complimentary cooler backpack for review, but did not provide compensation or exercise control over the content of this post.


The Specs

  • 25L main compartment holds food/drinks for 3-4 people
  • Fully insulated, leakproof, seamless one-piece PEVA liner
  • Front pockets for plates, utensils, largest can fit 14″ laptop
  • Zippered pocket for small items
  • Side pockets for bottles or umbrella
  • Adjustable padded straps including waist/chest
  • Bottom straps for blanket or jacket
  • Includes waterproof pack cover

The main compartment is insulated and huge, easily fitting drinks and food for four people (specs says it can hold 25 cans).

All that food and drink could get quite heavy so it’s good there are shoulder straps as well as waist and chest straps, and a padded back.

The large front panel has organizer pockets for plates and utensils, with the largest big enough to hold a 14″ laptop.
A smaller zippered pocket is on the front, perfect for keys or a phone. We use it to hold the included rain cover pouch.

Performance

We tested this on a day trip, using it as a car cooler, as we don’t generally hike with a huge picnic feast.

We put some canned beverages and water bottles with a cold pack and small bag of ice and left it to cook in the car on a hot sunny day as we hiked. Everything was still cold when we were done later that day.

Once back home we brought the bag in then totally forgot about it until hours later – but the items that were left were still ice cold.

Overall

This bag ticks all the boxes for everything needed in a backpack cooler – big insulated compartment, plenty of pockets, full straps with padding – plus throws in nice extras like a rain cover and bottom straps for a blanket or jacket.

Get an OUTXE Cooler Backpack

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Blue Mountain – Red Maple Trail, Appalachian Trail, Jacobs Ladder

Hike to a panoramic view from Blue Mountain in Stokes State Forest via the Red Maple Trail, the Appalachian Trail, and Jacobs Ladder.

8.5 miles, mix of woods road and rocky rooty trail. Short steep section over a rock slab up and down on Red Maple, another longer one downhill on Jacob’s Ladder. Steep up/down to Blue Mountain. Stream crossing.

Shorter: 7.0 – Skipping Blue Mountain removes 1.5 but misses the big viewpoint.
Longer: The Appalachian Trail keeps going and going…
Alternate: Red Maple only. It’s 5 miles one-way from the lot to Tillman Ravine.
Alternate: Loop on Red Maple starting from Tillman Ravine.
Nearby: Tillman Ravine, Blue Mountain Loop – Lower, Appalachian Trail – Culvers Gap to Blue Mountain

Hike Info:
–Trail Map
–Trail Map 2
–Park info
–Google Map
–Download GPX

Our two cents: The view from Blue Mountain always makes a nice destination and this route incorporates a mix of trails in Stokes.

Map: Kittatinny Trails or the Stokes park map. There are some minor differe..


Hike to a panoramic view from Blue Mountain in Stokes State Forest via the Red Maple Trail, the Appalachian Trail, and Jacobs Ladder.

8.5 miles, mix of woods road and rocky rooty trail. Short steep section over a rock slab up and down on Red Maple, another longer one downhill on Jacob’s Ladder. Steep up/down to Blue Mountain. Stream crossing.

Hike Info:

–Trail Map
–Trail Map 2
–Park info
–Google Map
–Download GPX

Our two cents: The view from Blue Mountain always makes a nice destination and this route incorporates a mix of trails in Stokes.

Map: Kittatinny Trails or the Stokes park map. There are some minor differences between them regarding the Steffen and Shay trails.

Books: None that we know of.

Parking: N41.18410° W74.81167°
Rt 206 N into Stokes State Forest, pass the entrance for the park office on the right. Next L onto Struble Road. In about a half mile Struble turns to the right at large dirt parking area on the left, for Lake Ashroe Rec Area.

Restrooms: Porta-john in lot.

Start of the Red Maple trail.
Red Maple parking area on Struble Road
Red Maple trail marker is a red maple leaf.
Big rock cairn on Red Maple
Brinks Road/Shay Trail
Appalachian Trail
Appalachian Trail on Blue Mountain.
View from Blue Mountain
Appalachian Trail on Blue Mountain, looking south.
Top of Blue Mountain.
Appalachian Trail on Blue Mountain.
Appalachian Trail on Blue Mountain.
Heading back on the Appalachian Trail on Blue Mountain.
First limited view on Appalachian Trail
Second limited view on Appalachian Trail
Jacobs Ladder Trail
Looking back up steep Jacobs Ladder
Stream crossing on Jacobs Ladder

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Hike Directions:

Overview: Red Maple (RED LEAF) – Brinks Road/Shay Trail – Appalachian Trail [WHITE] – Jacobs Ladder (BLUE/GRAY) – Red Maple (RED LEAF)

0.0 – From the parking lot, follow the dirt driveway in between the wood fence at the “no vehicle access…” sign.

Start following Red Maple (RED LEAF) as it skirts around a scout camp and then heads into the woods and starts uphill.

There is a short steep section over a rock slab.

1.1 – Follow Red Maple (RED LEAF) as it turns RIGHT at a large rock pile with a painted red rock.

[Unmarked trail goes straight. Steffen (Black/Gray) goes to the left. On the TC map this is the end of Steffen, while on the Stokes park map Steffen continues to the right as well.]

1.6 – Follow Red Maple (RED LEAF) as it turns LEFT onto a woods road.

[The woods road also goes right, marked as Coss Road on the TC map.

1.7 – In a small clearing follow Red Maple (RED LEAF) as it turns RIGHT onto another woods road. You might hear the nearby stream.

[An unmarked woods road also goes left. The Jacob’s Ladder trail is a few steps in this direction and is the return route but we didn’t notice it at all.

Alternate: Reverse the loop by taking Jacob’s Ladder for a steep up instead of down]

Red Maple (RED LEAF) follows a mostly level woods road, eventually passing a wet area off on the right where frogs and birds were making all sorts of a ruckus the day we hiked.

3.1 – Turn LEFT at the gate and now follow a woods road.

This is marked as Brink Road or Shay Trail depending on the map, and we don’t recall seeing any blazes.

[Red Maple (RED LEAF) goes straight and continues to Tillman Ravine. Brink Road (unmarked) goes off to the right]

Soon, pass the Brink Road Shelter/outhouse off on the right.

3.3 – Turn RIGHT and now follow Appalachian Trail [WHITE] uphill to the summit of Blue Mountain and some panoramic views.

4.1 – Panoramic views from Blue Mountain.

Turn around and head back on Appalachian Trail [WHITE].

There are some rocks off on the left that is our usual break spot and turn around point, but turn around whenever – the AT just keeps going.

4.8 – Continue straight on Appalachian Trail [WHITE] through the intersection with Brink Road from before.

5.9 – The first of two limited viewpoints on the right – the side trails to them can be hard to spot. They face the opposite direction over New Jersey than Blue Mountain does.

Continue on Appalachian Trail [WHITE].

6.1 – Second limited view. Continue on Appalachian Trail [WHITE].

6.4 – Turn LEFT to now follow Jacobs Ladder (BLUE/GRAY).

[Appalachian Trail [WHITE] continues straight, all the way to Maine.]

Jacobs Ladder (BLUE/GRAY) heads steeply downhill, with a section over a long rock slab (with “ladder” in the name I was expecting worse but it wasn’t nearly as bad as I anticipated.)

6.8 – Cross a stream at the end of Jacobs Ladder (BLUE/GRAY).

This looked to be flowing more than usual the day we hiked it (because all it does is rain in New Jersey anymore) and involved a bit of leap across.

Once across the stream, start following Red Maple (RED LEAF) again by turning LEFT a few steps and then RIGHT.

Be mindful of the intersection here: after crossing the stream you on a woods road… to the right it’s unmarked and to the left is Red Maple (RED LEAF) which splits in two directions.

Be sure to turn LEFT then RIGHT for the correct direction on Red Maple or you’ll be retracing your route back to Blue Mountain.

6.9 – Continue on Red Maple (RED LEAF) as it turns RIGHT.

[A woods road continues ahead, marked as Coss Road on the TC map.]

7.4 – Continue on Red Maple (RED LEAF) as it turns LEFT at the rock cairn.

[Steffen (Black/Gray) goes straight. Unmarked is to the right.]

Follow Red Maple (RED LEAF) back to the lot.

Hiked: 6/1/19.

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10 Years of njHiking.com

It’s been 10 years since we launched njHiking.com!
Back in the spring of 2009 when we started posting our hike descriptions, photos, and videos, we never imagined how many people would find it useful.

It started a long time ago…
The site was a long time in launching. We started putting together ideas in the early 2000s and registered the domain a few years later.

In 2006 we designed the first version on our local server and started logging our hikes. Dig deep enough and you’ll find those first not-so-great short posts.

Finally, after a few more designs and many more hikes, we went live in March of 2009. That first month the site received just a few hundred visits.

10 years and millions of website visitors, 3000+ miles, and untold gallons of post-hike ice cream later… here we are.

A huge THANK YOU to everyone who’s supported NJ HIKING over the years!!!

We’d also like to recognize the NY-NJ Trail Conference who have been building and maintaining trails in New Jersey for nearly 100 ..


It’s been 10 years since we launched njHiking.com!

Back in the spring of 2009 when we started posting our hike descriptions, photos, and videos, we never imagined how many people would find it useful.

It started a long time ago…

The site was a long time in launching. We started putting together ideas in the early 2000s and registered the domain a few years later.

In 2006 we designed the first version on our local server and started logging our hikes. Dig deep enough and you’ll find those first not-so-great short posts.

Finally, after a few more designs and many more hikes, we went live in March of 2009. That first month the site received just a few hundred visits.

10 years and millions of website visitors, 3000+ miles, and untold gallons of post-hike ice cream later… here we are.

A huge THANK YOU to everyone who’s supported NJ HIKING over the years!!!

We’d also like to recognize the NY-NJ Trail Conference who have been building and maintaining trails in New Jersey for nearly 100 years, as well as the countless other groups and organizations that maintain trails in New Jersey.

– Dawn & Tom

We celebrated by giving a $100 REI gift card to a lucky NJ hiker! The winner is…

Molly S. from Hopewell, New Jersey

Congratulations Molly! We hope you’ll put it toward swanky new boots, a backpack, or some other cool gear.

Rules: Contest will begin on May 1, 2019 and end on May 31, 2019. Enter on njHiking.com. Entrants must be 18 or over. One (1) winner will be selected via random drawing upon completion of the entry period. One (1) prize of a $100 REI gift card will be awarded.

Winner will be notified by email. Only the winner’s first name and city/state will be shared on the njHiking.com website and social media. Gift card will be mailed from REI to the address provided. njHiking.com is not liable for card being unable to be delivered. The gift card will be subject to the terms and conditions as set forth by the issuer of the gift card. Gift cards are not refundable or transferable and may not be substituted or exchanged for cash or credit at any time, nor will gift cards be replaced if lost or stolen.

Employees and their families of njHiking.com and REI are not eligible to win the prize.

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Cairn Subscription Box for June 2019

What’s inside the Cairn outdoor subscription box for June 2019.
Considering getting a Cairn subscription or giving one as a gift? Here’s a rundown of what this month’s box offers.

Disclaimer: Cairn provided a complimentary box for review, but did not provide compensation or exercise control over the content of this post.

In this month’s box

Value
Adventure Medical Kit for Hikers
Compact kit with ample first-aid supplies, suitable for 2 hikers for 2 days.
$25
Active Skin Repair Spray
Skin repair spray for wounds, cuts, bites, rashes, sunburn.
$25
Kate’s Real Food Bivy Bar
Hand-rolled, organic ingredients sweetened with honey. Lemon Coconut.
$3

Total Value: $53

This month Cairn is “showing up” with items that help prep for issues that might crop up in outdoor pursuits with a hiker first aid kit, wound healing spray, and a real food bar.

Adventure Medical Kit for Hikers
This kit is geared for two hikers out for two days. The compact bag unzips and opens flat, measures 6.5 x 5.5 x ..

Cairn Box for June 2019
What’s inside the Cairn outdoor subscription box for June 2019.

Considering getting a Cairn subscription or giving one as a gift? Here’s a rundown of what this month’s box offers.

Disclaimer: Cairn provided a complimentary box for review, but did not provide compensation or exercise control over the content of this post.

In this month’s box

Value
Adventure Medical Kit for Hikers Compact kit with ample first-aid supplies, suitable for 2 hikers for 2 days. $25
Active Skin Repair Spray Skin repair spray for wounds, cuts, bites, rashes, sunburn. $25
Kate’s Real Food Bivy Bar Hand-rolled, organic ingredients sweetened with honey. Lemon Coconut. $3


Total Value: $53

Hiker Adventure Medical Kit, Active repair spray, Kate's Real Food Bar
This month Cairn is “showing up” with items that help prep for issues that might crop up in outdoor pursuits with a hiker first aid kit, wound healing spray, and a real food bar.

Adventure Medical Kit for Hikers

This kit is geared for two hikers out for two days. The compact bag unzips and opens flat, measures 6.5 x 5.5 x 3 inches, and weighs 7.2 ounces.

There are three separate sections with zippered pockets: wound/burn/blister care, meds and cuts/scrapes, and “stop bleeding fast”.

It includes the usual basics in bandages, wipes, and meds but also a guide to wilderness first aid, scissors to cut the provided bandages and gauze, and rubber gloves.

There’s enough here to handle most situations contained in a well organized and compact kit.

Contents of the Adventure Medical Kit for Hikers

Active Skin Repair Spray

This non-stinging antibacterial first-aid spray is natural, non-toxic and supports the body’s healing process by using HOCl – a clinically proven molecule used in hospitals worldwide.

Use the spray to heal minor wounds, cuts, scrapes, sunburns, traditional burns, chafing, rashes, wounds, insect bites and other skin irritations.

Active Repair Spray Bottle

Kate’s Real Food Bivy Bar

Organic oats, almond butter, coconut, honey, lemon, ginger yummy-ness. Bar is two servings, each serving is 150 calories and 10g of fat so you might not want to nosh this at your desk.Kate's Real Food Lemon Coconut Bar

The latest specials from Cairn:

The Summer 2019 Obsidian Collection – “Taste The Good Life" features camping cookwear from Primus Equipment, Opinel, and GrubStick, a growler from MiiR, pancakes and syrup from Backpacker's Pantry and Runamok Maple. Limited quantities available!
The Hammock Collection – This curated welcome box includes: Serac Classic Hammock, Serac Straps, Peak Sherpa Energy Bites, Natrapel Wipes. While supplies last!

Find out more about Cairn.

And check out our full review of Cairn.

More run downs:
Cairn – June 2019
Cairn – May 2019
Cairn – April 2019
Cairn – March 2019
Cairn – February 2019
Cairn – January 2019
Cairn – December 2018
Cairn – November 2018
Cairn – October 2018
Cairn – September 2018
Cairn – August 2018
Cairn – July 2018
A Year of Cairn
All reviews…

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Mt. Tammany – Delaware Water Gap

Climb steeply uphill to a fantastic overlook of the Delaware Water Gap and Mt. Minsi across the way.
Our two cents: This is one of the most popular hikes in New Jersey. You probably won’t have the trail to yourself but the view is worth the crowds.

And you never know what you are going to get when you hit the top…

We’ve been there on beautiful fall days with only a couple people quietly taking in the view… while one time we arrived to find tons of people, a guitar player belting out tunes, and people passing around a box of donuts. Ahhh, Jersey.

Note: Many people manage this route, but please be aware this is most certainly a hike – and not a la-di-da stroll in the park.

Hike Info:
–Trail Map
–Park info
–Park info 2
–Google Map
–Download GPX

3.5 miles. Rocky, steep. Short in length, but strenuous due to steepness. Rock scrambling. The return trail is less steep but still very rocky.

This loop goes up the RED DOT trail and returns down the BLUE trail. We recommend this way as the ..


Climb steeply uphill to a fantastic overlook of the Delaware Water Gap and Mt. Minsi across the way.

Our two cents: This is one of the most popular hikes in New Jersey. You probably won’t have the trail to yourself but the view is worth the crowds.

And you never know what you are going to get when you hit the top…

We’ve been there on beautiful fall days with only a couple people quietly taking in the view… while one time we arrived to find tons of people, a guitar player belting out tunes, and people passing around a box of donuts. Ahhh, Jersey.

Note: Many people manage this route, but please be aware this is most certainly a hike – and not a la-di-da stroll in the park.

Hike Info:

–Trail Map
–Park info
–Park info 2
–Google Map
–Download GPX

3.5 miles. Rocky, steep. Short in length, but strenuous due to steepness. Rock scrambling. The return trail is less steep but still very rocky.

This loop goes up the RED DOT trail and returns down the BLUE trail. We recommend this way as the rock scrambles on RED DOT are a bit harder to negotiate going down.

  • Easier variation: Up/down on BLUE. Miss a view on the RED trail and it’s a less interesting hike – but it’s easier and arrives at the same viewpoint.
  • Easy/super short option: If the hike up is too much, or some people in your group don’t want to go, instead of hitting the summit you can go to the far end of the parking lot, head over the bridge and walk along Dunnfield Creek. This is a stunning area of New Jersey and is gorgeous in any season (if you do the loop hike below, you will pass by this area on your way back). At the trail split (big ole sign there, can’t miss it), bear right to another bridge over the creek and Dunnfield Falls and some lovely water cascades.
  • Challenging: Check out Mt. Tammany and Sunfish Pond or our “Mind The Gap” hike.
  • Nearby: Sunfish Pond, Appalachian Trail – Sunfish Pond to Raccoon Ridge, Sunfish Pond – Garvey Springs and Douglas Loop, Mt. Minsi.

View of Mt. Minsi and the Delaware Water Gap at the first viewpoint.

Fun Fact: The Delaware Water Gap is nowhere near the state of Delaware, as many people often believe. A “water gap” is when a river carves a notch through a mountain range.

At the border of New Jersey and Pennsylvania, the Delaware River has cut through the Kittatinny Ridge leaving a large gap with Mt. Tammany on the New Jersey side, and Mt. Minsi on the Pennsylvania side.

Updated 6/2019: Re-hiked the RED DOT-BLUE loop, description updated, added photos, updated GPX file and Google Map (same route, just replacing our 10-year-old file (!) with newer GPS data.)

Map:

Map# 121 of the Kittatinny Trails map set. The Mt. Tammany area is in the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation area, while parts of BLUE DOT and the Dunnfield Creek Trail are in Worthington State Forest.

Books:

This hike with a map diagram can be found in 50 Hikes in New Jersey and in Hike of the Week.

A version including Sunfish Pond is in Hiking
New Jersey
. Info on all the trails in the area can be found in Kittatinny Trails and the The New Jersey Walk Book.

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Parking lot overview as seen from Mt. Minsi.
RED DOT trail is rocky right from the start.
Rocky RED DOT trail
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View from the first overlook. Mt Tammany on the left, Delaware River, then Mt. Minsi on the right.
From the first viewpoint, Mt. Minsi on the right, Arrow Island in the middle, and Mt. Tammany to the left.
RED DOT levels off a bit.
Hikers negotiate a rocky section of RED DOT ahead.
Some sections of RED DOT are very rocky.
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Rocky section of the Red Dot trail on the way up.
RED DOT trail continues making its way up.
View of Mt. Minsi from the top of Mt. Tammany.
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View of Mt. Minsi from the summit of Mt. Tammany
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View of the Gap from the summit of Mt. Tammany
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View from the summit of Mt. Tammany
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Rt. 80 below the Red Dot trail.
Trail marker for hikers coming up the other direction, on the BLUE trail.
BLUE starts just beyond the Mt. Tammany viewpoint.
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View from along the Blue trail just beyond the summit.
BLUE turns LEFT.
BLUE trail is a rocky and eroded woods road.
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Blue levels off and becomes less rocky and steep.
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Joining up with the Green trail by Dunnfield Creek.
Small waterfall dropping into a shallow pool along Dunnfield Creek.
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Dunnfield Falls.
Cascades along Dunnfield Creek.
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Bridge over Dunnfield Creek
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Join up with the Appalachian Trail, along Dunnfield Creek
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Dunnfield Creek
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Dunnfield Creek from the bridge just near the parking lot.
Dimensional map showing the hike.

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Parking:

N40.97213° W75.12592° [Dunnfield Lot]
Route 80 West to just before the last exit in New Jersey. On the right is a sign for Dunnfield Creek Natural Area.

There is a parking lot on the right, then a large main lot (parking on the grass area past the main lot is no longer allowed). The road is one way so you can’t backtrack to a passed lot unless you get back onto Rt 80 and come around.

In the photo gallery, we’ve added a photo overview of the parking lots as it’s just easier to show it than explain it.

These lots fill quickly and are often closed by 10am in season. If those are full, park at the visitor center and walk back to the trailhead or use the shuttle that runs in season. If it’s crazy crowded, consider a nearby hike listed above.

Kittatinny Point Visitor Center: Head back out onto Rt. 80 from the Dunnfield lot and take the very next exit right, then make a left like you are going to go around to 80 E, then instead of merging onto 80, immediately head to the right into the visitor center.

HIKER SHUTTLE to the Dunnfield Creek lot and Kittatinny Visitors Center runs weekends and holidays from Saturday, May 26, 2018 until Labor Day. Every half hour between 10 AM and 5:30 PM, departing from the Park and Ride in PA. Cost is $1 per person. Lots often are full by 10am, this is to alleviate parking issues. Info: www.gomcta.com.

Restrooms:

Porta-john(s) in the back of the lot (as of June 2019, but sometimes there hasn’t been one). Toilets also at the Kittatinny Point Visitor Center.

There is rest area, Delaware Water Gap Travel Plaza, on Rt. 80 W. about 5 mins before the trailhead.

Hike Directions:

IMPORTANT: The RED DOT trailhead is at the beginning of the main lot, near the road (when driving into the lot, it is on your right). Look for the big brown sign with red blazes.

At the far end of the lot is the start of the rest of the area’s trails. People often mistake this as the trail to the summit. If you immediately head over a bridge, you are not on RED DOT.

While Mt. Tammany can be reached from the BLUE trail further down, people are usually looking to do the RED DOT trail.

We’ve run into people going the opposite way, miles away along Dunnfield (GREEN) or the Appalachian Trail, that thought they were hiking to Mt Tammany… so make sure to find the right trail.

Overview: RED DOT – BLUE – Dunnfield Creek (GREEN) – Appalachian Trail (WHITE)

RED DOT is a red dot on white. Depending on the map, the BLUE trail may be BLUE DOT and on newer maps as “Pahaquarry Trail” – but for simplicity we’ve kept it as BLUE.

0.0 – Start heading uphill on a rocky trail.

0.5 – Very nice view where Mt. Tammany can be seen on the left, Rt. 80 and the Delaware River going through “The Gap” in the center, and Mt Minsi on the right.

Shorter Option: You can turn around here if you’ve decided that was enough hiking for you.

There is a very rocky section shortly after this viewpoint. Continue to follow RED DOT up – there is only one trail in this area and is mostly easy to follow.

Pay attention on the rocky sections for markers to guide you through – they may be painted on the rocks as well.

Delaware Water Gap  T-Shirts and More
Water Gap T-Shirts and More

1.3 – At the rocky summit, there are broad views of the entire Delaware Water Gap area, Rt. 80 and Mt Minsi across the Delaware River.

Turn right to scramble down the rocks as far as is comfortable, or stay at the top.

This is a good spot to watch hawks and turkey vultures ride the thermal air currents. And, of course, have a snack.

RED DOT ends. Look for the BLUE markers that start past the viewpoint to now follow BLUE.

Variation: Retrace RED DOT back – going downhill over the rocks is steep and can be tricky so most people take BLUE DOT back as it is more gradual.

1.7 – Turn LEFT at the sign to continue following BLUE downhill on a very eroded woods road. [The Mt Tammany Fire Road (unmarked) continues straight.]

2.2 – Continue following BLUE as it marks a sharp LEFT.

2.9 – Turn LEFT to start following Dunnfield Creek (GREEN) which may also have BLUE blazes. [Dunnfield Creek (GREEN) also goes to the right.]

The creek, several cascades, and Dunnfield Falls comes into view. There is a wooden bench.

Continue following Dunnfield Creek (GREEN) over a bridge before ending at the Appalachian Trail (WHITE).

Continue straight, now following the Appalachian Trail (WHITE) along pretty Dunnfield Creek and back to the parking lot.

Hiked 6/9/19. Mt. Tammany, with A.
Hiked 8/22/15. Tammany, Fire Road, Sunfish, with M.
Hiked 10/23/10. Trail Blog: “Mt. Tammany and Sunfish Pond in the Fall

Hiked 10/25/09. With Mt. Minsi – Mind The Gap.
Hiked 3/22/09. Trail Blog: “Water Gap: Mt. Tammany, Fire Road, Sunfish Pond, Dunnfield Creek
Hiked 8/03/08. Trail Blog: “Water Gap – Mt. Tammany to Fire Road to Sunfish to Green
Hiked 1/22/06. Trail Blog: “Delaware Water Gap – Mt. Tammany Summit and Beyond

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Coppermines, Appalachian Trail, Catfish Fire Tower, Rattlesnake Swamp

Loop with streams, water cascades, mines (closed), ridge views, the Catfish fire tower, rhododendron tunnels, and a swamp.
10.2 miles; shorter options. Rocky trail surface. Coppermine Trail follows a stream for a lot of the way, and heads gradually uphill. Rattlesnake Swamp trail skirts the swamp and can be soft or muddy in several areas.

Hike Info:
–Trail Map
–Park info
–Online Map

Shorter: 1.4 mile, 2 mile. 4.8 mile, 7.2 mile options – noted in the description below.
Alternates: Use nearby Kaiser trail to make other loops.
Nearby: Van Campens Glen, Laurel Falls, Sunfish Pond – Garvey Springs and Douglas Loop, Appalachian Trail – Sunfish Pond to Raccoon Ridge.
Our two-cents:
Do this in the spring for maximum water flow or after recent rain. There are several nice cascades along the way, though the larger waterfalls seem to be no more.

The trails in this area have lots of Mountain Laurel or Rhododendron (blooms May-June and June-July, respectively).

In addition to the Catfish Fire..

Coppermines trail
Loop with streams, water cascades, mines (closed), ridge views, the Catfish fire tower, rhododendron tunnels, and a swamp.

10.2 miles; shorter options. Rocky trail surface. Coppermine Trail follows a stream for a lot of the way, and heads gradually uphill. Rattlesnake Swamp trail skirts the swamp and can be soft or muddy in several areas.

Hike Info:

–Trail Map
–Park info
–Online Map

Our two-cents:

Do this in the spring for maximum water flow or after recent rain. There are several nice cascades along the way, though the larger waterfalls seem to be no more.

The trails in this area have lots of Mountain Laurel or Rhododendron (blooms May-June and June-July, respectively).

In addition to the Catfish Fire Tower and picnic table, there are many viewpoints (and nice break spots) along the Appalachian Trail that overlook rural New Jersey so fall is a nice time to hike this too.

Coppermine Trail
Coppermine parking area
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Unmarked spur trail in the beginning of this hike
Mine isn't obvious when approaching.
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Mine entrance, 2016
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Mine entrance, 2016
493A9320
Looking through the metal gate into the mine
02b
The mine in 2011
Building remains past the mine
The second mine, 2019
Looking through the gate of the second mine.
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The second mine, in 2011
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Cascade on the spur trail by the mine, 2016.
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Close up
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Bridge on Coppermines, 2011
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Cascade near the bridge, 2011
493A9340
Close up, 2016
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Waterfall about a mile in, 2016
493A9366
Close up
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This was the original waterfall in this area in 2011 and was totally dry in 2016 and 2019.
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Wide shot of that old waterfall, 2011
Coppermine Trail
Ferns along Coppermine Trail
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Appalachian Trail
View from the Appalachian Trail over New Jersey
View from the Appalachian Trail over New Jersey
Shady break spot on the Appalachian Trail
View from the Appalachian Trail over New Jersey
Catfish Fire Tower
Going up
View from the Catfish Fire Tower south
View from the Catfish Fire Tower north over New Jersey
View from the Catfish Fire Tower over New Jersey
Rattlesnake Swamp Trail
Rattlesnake Swamp Trail
Rhododendron and mountain laurel tunnels.
Mountain laurel
Rattlesnake Swamp
Rattlesnake Swamp Trail
Approaching Mohican Outdoor Center on the Rattlesnake Swamp trail
Catfish Pond comes into view along Rattlesnake Swamp Trail
Mohican Outdoor Center
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Path through Mohican Outdoor
Walking down the camp road
Catfish Pond

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Map:

Kittatinny Trails or use our Coppermines Online Map with a smartphone.

An overview map is on the park site but as of 6/2019 there are no detail maps provided online. For paper maps check a visitor center (Kittatinny Point, Millbrook Village).

Note: Google Maps shows “Rattlesnake Trail” as point along the Appalachian Trail but is not near the actual intersection of the AT and Rattlesnake Swamp.

Books:

A 5.5 mile variation using Kaiser appears in Hiking
New Jersey
, a 7.8 mile variation in Hike of the Week, and a 5 mile loop using just the Rattlesnake Swamp/A.T. section is in 50 Hikes in New Jersey.

A good 5.7 loop starting from Mohican Outdoor parking instead and hitting the cascades but skipping the mines is in Best Day Hikes in New Jersey (New, 2019).

Trail descriptions appear in the Kittatinny Trails and the The New Jersey Walk Book.

Parking: N41.03835° W75.02752

Rt. 80 W to the last exit in NJ (1) for Millbrook/Flatbrookville which bears right onto River Road/Old Mine Road. Cross a one-lane bridge with a stop light and continue on Old Mine Rd for about 7 miles.

The parking lot is on the left, with a sign for Coppermine on the right side of the road. (Don’t confuse it with the Douglas parking lot that you will pass on the left before.)

The lot is on “Old Mine Rd, Hardwick Township, NJ 07825” – but this is a park road in the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area with no street number to enter into a GPS.

Rest rooms:

A porta-john was in the lot as of 6/2019. A composting toilet building is a few minutes drive north of the parking area, near “Poxono Access” on the map.

Bathrooms at the Kittatinny Visitor Center, but that is on Rt 80 E and you’ll need to loop around. There is rest area on Rt. 80 W. about 20 minutes before the trailhead: Delaware Water Gap Travel Plaza.

Update 6/2019 – Re-hiked, updated description and online map data, added photos. Removed this hike from the Best Waterfall Hikes in NJ page as they’ve changed and reduced in flow from when we originally added it. Still a great hike though! 4/2016 – Re-hiked first mile only, added new photos, minor description changes.

Hike Directions:

Overview: Coppermine Trail (RED) – Unmarked Spur Trail – Coppermine Trail (RED) – Appalachian Trail (WHITE) – – Unmarked Trail – Rattlesnake Swamp (ORANGE) – Road through Mohican Outdoor Center – Coppermine Trail (RED).

0.0 – The Coppermine Trail (RED) trail head is across Old Mine Road from the parking area.

Just a bit down the trail, at a post, turn LEFT onto a well-worn but unmarked trail for about 0.2 mile. There were several water cascades along the stream in 2016 but not as many in 2019.

The trail ends at a closed mine entrance. Turn around and return to the post.

When back at the post, turn LEFT to continue on Coppermine Trail (RED), passing some building remains.

The trail will start to head uphill on an old woods road.

0.5 – Continue on Coppermine Trail (RED), passing the junction of Kaiser Spur – Lower (BLUE) on the right. [This can be used to connect to the Kaiser trail for other hike loops.]

0.6 – Pass a closed mine entrance on the right, up a short steep incline (easy to miss).

Shortly, cross a stream on a wooden footbridge near some pretty cascades. Continue following Coppermine Trail (RED) as it switchbacks uphill.

[Shorter, 1.4 miles: Turn around at the bridge and retrace.]

1.0 – The trail rises above the stream. Several cascades may be visible below before arriving at an open area with cascades and possibly a small waterfall (2019: now hard to see and too overgrown to bother getting closer).

(Note: The main waterfall in this area in 2011 was dry in 2016. By 2019 it was hard to tell there used to be something there, it was so clogged.

In 2016, a waterfall appeared in an area that I don’t think had one in 2011 – so it’s likely that the water route changed. By 2019, this was hard to see and get to.)

[Shorter, 2.0 miles: Turn around and retrace.]

1.2 – Turn LEFT to continue on Coppermine Trail (RED)

[Kaiser Spur – Upper (BLUE) goes right and would meet up with Kaiser (BLUE) to make a loop back to the parking lot]

2.4 – Turn LEFT to now follow the Appalachian Trail (WHITE). [Coppermine Trail (RED) ends].

[Shorter, 4.8 miles: Retrace the route from this point.]

Cross a stream on a bridge, then cross over the gravel camp road (which leads to Mohican Outdoor Center). The Appalachian Trail (WHITE) heads steadily uphill to gain the ridge.

3.2 – Get a peek of the ridge views to come at two rocks, with limited views. There are better in just a bit.

3.5 – Shady rock in a little open area we like to stop at – but there are multiple view points and good break areas along the ridge (we didn’t mark all of them). There’s another just after this one.

3.8 – Pass Rattlesnake Swamp (ORANGE) on the left (easy to miss, tucked back a bit) and continue on Appalachian Trail (WHITE).

[Shorter, 7.2 miles: Turn left and follow Rattlesnake Swamp (ORANGE) and resume directions at 7.3 below. This removes 3.0 miles and the fire tower from this hike.]

4.7 – Catfish Fire Tower. Picnic table.

5.0 – Watch for the Appalachian Trail (WHITE) blazes indicating a turn off to the LEFT, while a woods road continues straight.

5.2 – Turn LEFT off of the Appalachian Trail (WHITE) onto a woods road. This is shown as an unmarked trail on the Kittatinny Trails map but was not marked at the actual trail intersection.

[Appalachian Trail (WHITE) continues ahead, to Maine.]

5.4 – Signpost for “Rattlesnake Swamp Trail” and “Fire Tower 1.5 miles” and a large stump post with 3-orange blazes. Turn LEFT to start following Rattlesnake Swamp (ORANGE).

Rhododendron and mountain laurel thickets line both sides of the trail.

Pass a swampy area on the right, then eventually Catfish Pond will be visible through the trees on the right as well.

7.3 – Signpost indicating “Rattlesnake Swamp/AT” to the left and “Camp Mohican” to the right. Turn RIGHT to now follow the unmarked trail through Camp Mohican.

7.4 – When you arrive in the main camp area, at a cabin, turn LEFT onto the gravel road and follow that through camp.

Pass a camp outhouse on the right, circle of benches.

7.6 – Open view of Catfish Pond on the right. Continue on the gravel road. Pass the Mohican Outdoor Center Lodge and parking lot.

8.1 – Turn RIGHT to start following the Appalachian Trail (WHITE) again (you crossed the road here earlier).

Cross the footbridge and soon turn RIGHT onto the start of the Coppermine Trail (RED).

At this point you are retracing your route from earlier, following Coppermine Trail (RED) back to the parking lot.

Hiked: 6/15/19.
Hiked: 4/10/16. First mile only, for waterfall photos. “Silver Spray Falls, Buttermilk Falls, Coppermines cascades

Hiked: 5/29/11. Trail Blog: “Delaware Water Gap: Coppermines – Rattlesnake Swamp

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