Category: Hiking

NH 4K: Mount Moosilauke via Tunnel Brook, Benton Trail

Follow me on Facebook!
The Benton Trail has been on my list of trails to hike for quite a while, and I finally got around to doing it. Relative to the other trails up Moosilauke, it is much more quiet.

The trail actually starts at the Tunnel Brook Trailhead due to the destruction of the original trailhead area due to Hurricane Irene. This is a pleasant, section of trail that probably keeps most of the crowds away.

At the actual trailhead for the Benton Trail, I began the moderate ascent up to the top. It's a bit of an eroded trail, but as you get higher up it gets more pleasant, passing a great viewpoint of the valley below on the way, seen in the first picture above.

At the top, there were only clouds, which I've gotten used to on my many ascents of the Moose. All the more reason to book it down. The trail was absolutely perfect for trail running, and I cruised back to the car easily.

Total Time: 2 hrs 24 minsTotal Distance: ~10 miles (9.11 miles on my Garmin Fenix 5x Pl..

Follow me on Facebook!
The Benton Trail has been on my list of trails to hike for quite a while, and I finally got around to doing it. Relative to the other trails up Moosilauke, it is much more quiet.

The trail actually starts at the Tunnel Brook Trailhead due to the destruction of the original trailhead area due to Hurricane Irene. This is a pleasant, section of trail that probably keeps most of the crowds away.




At the actual trailhead for the Benton Trail, I began the moderate ascent up to the top. It's a bit of an eroded trail, but as you get higher up it gets more pleasant, passing a great viewpoint of the valley below on the way, seen in the first picture above.






At the top, there were only clouds, which I've gotten used to on my many ascents of the Moose. All the more reason to book it down. The trail was absolutely perfect for trail running, and I cruised back to the car easily.


Total Time: 2 hrs 24 minsTotal Distance: ~10 miles (9.11 miles on my Garmin Fenix 5x Plus)Total Elevation Gain: ~3400 vertical gain

No Comments on NH 4K: Mount Moosilauke via Tunnel Brook, Benton Trail

Nutrition on the Trail

The eating habits of thru-hikers can be quite abysmal. We typically look for calorie-dense, easily accessible, and cheap options. This is where you can insert the ongoing joke of thru-hikers eating a snickers bar a day (but seriously, I have eaten a snickers bar a day for some of my adventures).

Access and price are often determining factors when filling your food bag, especially when you decide to resupply on the way, meaning for the duration of a hike your provisions come from the next grocery store you encounter. Sometimes that grocery store is a gas station or remote wilderness outpost where you are lucky to find ramen, pop tarts, chips, and candy at three times the usual cost.

For many of the 13 different long-distance trails I’ve hiked over the last 20 years, resupply along the way has been my strategy. It massively cuts down on the logistics of putting together food boxes before you go (can you imagine how many food boxes you would need for a 2,000-mile trail?). Buying your fo..

The eating habits of thru-hikers can be quite abysmal. We typically look for calorie-dense, easily accessible, and cheap options. This is where you can insert the ongoing joke of thru-hikers eating a snickers bar a day (but seriously, I have eaten a snickers bar a day for some of my adventures).

Access and price are often determining factors when filling your food bag, especially when you decide to resupply on the way, meaning for the duration of a hike your provisions come from the next grocery store you encounter. Sometimes that grocery store is a gas station or remote wilderness outpost where you are lucky to find ramen, pop tarts, chips, and candy at three times the usual cost.

For many of the 13 different long-distance trails I’ve hiked over the last 20 years, resupply along the way has been my strategy. It massively cuts down on the logistics of putting together food boxes before you go (can you imagine how many food boxes you would need for a 2,000-mile trail?). Buying your food along the way can lead to more flexibility, for example: if you send your food box to a post office, you are tied to the post office’s open hours (which can be quite minimal in very small towns), where most grocery stores (and gas stations) keep much longer hours. Buying along the way also allows you to change up your diet as your tastes change. I’ve met more than one hiker that got a deal on 200 energy bars of a certain brand only to find by week two that they couldn’t stomach eating even one more….and…as luck would have it…those bars were in every pre-made resupply box for the whole trail.

Now that I’m in my 40s, I’ve started experimenting with eating more nutrient-dense and healthy foods off-trail, so accordingly have begun to experiment with how I could eat that way on the trail. No more She-tos for me! (The She-to mix combines cheetos – a long staple in my trail diet – with nuts and cheddar pretzel bits. If your blood pressure just went up reading that, then you get the salt-bomb intent of the snack.)

She-to mix

I’ve had some hikers try to impart the wisdom of nutrition on the trail over the years; probably the most passionate food-aware hiker I know is Zoner, who I met in 2006 on the PCT. Zoner created his 2,000-mile Hot Springs Trail with the express purpose of routing you through towns with farmers markets. His real agenda for this route was to help hikers eat better. Wow!

Katie Gerber is a nutritionist who hiked the Oregon Desert Trail a few years ago and is a frequent guest on hiking podcasts to talk about eating and nutrition on the trails, she also has a hiker nutrition consulting business. So the knowledge and resources have been there for a while, I just needed to listen.

Last year I started to experiment with a plant-based diet. I was given the nudge by my good friend Carrie and her journey in exploring how food can improve different aspects of life.

What changed my perspective about my eating habits was considering food as medicine, that everything I put in my mouth could be working for me instead of against me.

Once I started eating this way I would bring actual fruit instead of gummy bears on a hike (I used to say I would eat something from the gummy family every day on a thru-hike). Instead of chips, I choose roasted chickpeas or veggies and hummus. Instead of a potato bomb (ramen with instant potatoes to soak up the salty msg soup), I would eat meals from Food for the Sole (a vegan and gluten-free backpacking food company started in Bend), or something that had a list of ingredients that contained real food (can’t pronounce an ingredient? Don’t eat it).

Pocket of gummies

the way lunch can be if you try…

I know, I needed to do this years ago.

For short trips this strategy works great! Kirk and I hiked the Timberline Trail around Mt Hood last year, and for the 5 days we were out I could eat and carry lots of fresh foods, but for longer trips fresh gets heavy, and the availability of good fresh fruits and vegetables in gas stations or very small remote towns can be hard to come by.

Then the pandemic happened…I let the global pandemic derail my new-found good habits, and I’m still not quite where I’d like to be with treating everything I put into my mouth as a performance enhancer or detractor. (It really can be that simple).

But I’m trying to pay attention to how my body feels and acts when I eat certain foods and think critically about changing my resupply strategy thanks to COVID. On a recent 100-mile section hike to ground-truth part of the Blue Mountains Trail, I hiked out of town with 7 days of food. 7 days is really the longest stretch I’ll do between resupplies. It’s just an almost unbearable weight and quantity if you try to carry much more than that. I spent some time dehydrating food and making my own cold-soak lunches and hot dinners. I carried dried fruit, dried veggies, and tried to find bars and other snacks with as few ingredients as possible.

I’ve always eaten a lot of nuts, and they can provide a powerful punch of calories and protein on a hike. A lovely and tasty addition to my diet has been to carry Gather Nuts, a soaked and then roasted line of very flavorful nuts and seeds. I met the owner, Shanna, this summer and was taken with her process of soaking each batch for 24-hours then slow roasting them on a low temperature… which all allows for better digestion and nutrient absorption…and they taste AMAZING! The nuts and seeds come out super crunchy (I love a good crunch), and the variety of flavors can satisfy both my sweet and salty tooth. (I have a trail “happy hour” with the Rosemary Olive Oil nuts, and the Maple Cinnamon Brasil Nuts are….well…you’ll just have to try them for yourself.)

Good with breakfast

Good until they are gone 😦

I have also found MicroBiome Bars which includes four prebiotic fibers, omega-3 fatty acids, beta-glucans and fermented protein (that’s all to say they include whole foods like organic wheat, oats, flax, and barley malt) and other ingredients like chocolate, cherries, oats, honey, peanut butter, cranberries, raspberries, apples, and almond butter. YUM.

MicroBiome bars are good on a ski tour too!

So finding healthy foods that have a shelf-life, or dehydrating whole foods (check out this great dehydrator cookbook by Julie Moser, founder of Food for the Sole) has become part of my food resupply strategy, and with COVID in our lives for the foreseeable future, making my own food boxes and avoiding extraneous contact on a hike is the new normal.

And lucky you! You can try some of this too. Gather Nuts has created a coupon code so that you can get 20% off an order of $25 or more at their store using the code: WEAREHIKERTRASH (my instagram handle).

Food for the Sole has a one-time use code you can use to get 20% off your order by using the code: SHERAHIKES.

So join me on my journey to be more intentional about what I put into my mouth, I can’t promise that cheetos and gummies will never pass these lips again, but I want to make them the exception, not the rule.

No Comments on Nutrition on the Trail

Point Of No Return

Have you ever been out walking and suddenly felt unwell, or had the weather turn bad unexpectantly? Have you ever found yourself in a quandary as to whether it would be quicker to turn back or continue? This is the sort of thing that can easily be planned for and implemented if necessary. It is … Continue reading Point Of No Return

Have you ever been out walking and suddenly felt unwell, or had the weather turn bad unexpectantly? Have you ever found yourself in a quandary as to whether it would be quicker to turn back or continue? This is the sort of thing that can easily be planned for and implemented if necessary. It is …

Continue reading Point Of No Return

No Comments on Point Of No Return

CDT Day 81 – Lagunitas

Date: 9/16/20

Daily Miles: 23

Total Miles: 1470

It was a really nice night and we both slept soundly. SweetPea heard elk bugling several times this morning after 4am. “Bugling” is such a strange term for it, since it sounds so weird and nothing like a bugle.

We headed out just as it was getting light enough that we didn’t need our headlamps. The snow was only patchy this morning…we seem to be walking to the southern edges of the snow fall. Most of the day was completely snow-free.

We walked on a dirt road for a bit this morning. We saw a few hunters in their trucks heading out. We also saw some hunter camps along the road. We greeted a group of four guys who were camped and they invited us to have a cup of coffee by their fire. They were super friendly and we asked all the elk hunting questions that had been building up in our minds over the past two weeks.

We ended up chatted with them around the fire for at least an hour. They offered to make us breakfast, but we knew we had to..

Date: 9/16/20

Daily Miles: 23

Total Miles: 1470

It was a really nice night and we both slept soundly. SweetPea heard elk bugling several times this morning after 4am. “Bugling” is such a strange term for it, since it sounds so weird and nothing like a bugle.

We headed out just as it was getting light enough that we didn’t need our headlamps. The snow was only patchy this morning…we seem to be walking to the southern edges of the snow fall. Most of the day was completely snow-free.

We walked on a dirt road for a bit this morning. We saw a few hunters in their trucks heading out. We also saw some hunter camps along the road. We greeted a group of four guys who were camped and they invited us to have a cup of coffee by their fire. They were super friendly and we asked all the elk hunting questions that had been building up in our minds over the past two weeks.

We ended up chatted with them around the fire for at least an hour. They offered to make us breakfast, but we knew we had to hike a lot of miles today, so we declined. But we had a great time talking with them and left their camp in high spirits.

The walking today was pretty easy. A lot of exposed walking in fields that are lined by forests. The landscape actually reminded us of of the north rim of the Grand Canyon. Luckily it was a beautiful, calm day with blue skies.

It seemed like a lot of the trail today had been recently built. Some of the trail, we knew was four years old, but other trail seemed like it could have been built just this year. A lot of the new trail seemed more geared to mountain bikers with lots of extra twists and turns. For us walking, it felt kinda weird and overly built. But, it was smooth walking, so we didn’t mind it.

We ran into two hikers this afternoon who are out for just a few days. They were heading north to where we started yesterday morning. It was nice to chat with them for a few minutes. We realized that we hadn’t actually seen another backpacker on the trail since the Winds in Wyoming, which was probably three weeks ago.

We made it to camp by 6:30pm. We seem to be in an area where a lot of people are car camping along a dirt road. It’s not really clear if they are hunters or not. But we’re camped not too far from the road, so we can hear their vehicles coming and going. We are in our hammocks by 7:20pm, which is great, since last night we were just getting to camp at that time.

The post CDT Day 81 – Lagunitas appeared first on Long Distance Hiker.

No Comments on CDT Day 81 – Lagunitas

CDT Day 83 – Harris Bear Spring

Date: 9/18/20

Daily Miles: 23

Total Miles: 1517

As expected, last night was really cold. Beardoh stayed warm and slept well, but SweetPea’s feet got cold during the night and she had a hard time sleeping. As we packed up in the dark, it was the usual situation of our fingers getting so cold that they hurt.

Again we started off in all our layers, trying to warm up our feet and hands. Beardoh has been starting most days lately without poles, just so he can keep his hands fisted up in his mittens to warm them quicker.

A lot of the trail this morning has been hijacked by the cows which graze in the area. Because they walk on the trail, and because it was muddy very recently, they have done a real number on it. The trail is now hardened into an ankle-twisting mess. It is really annoying to walk on…especially for multiple miles.

This morning, we came to a very small creek that was going to be our last water for 12 miles. As we were scooping the water into our bottles (it was pretty sha..

Date: 9/18/20

Daily Miles: 23

Total Miles: 1517

As expected, last night was really cold. Beardoh stayed warm and slept well, but SweetPea’s feet got cold during the night and she had a hard time sleeping. As we packed up in the dark, it was the usual situation of our fingers getting so cold that they hurt.

Again we started off in all our layers, trying to warm up our feet and hands. Beardoh has been starting most days lately without poles, just so he can keep his hands fisted up in his mittens to warm them quicker.

A lot of the trail this morning has been hijacked by the cows which graze in the area. Because they walk on the trail, and because it was muddy very recently, they have done a real number on it. The trail is now hardened into an ankle-twisting mess. It is really annoying to walk on…especially for multiple miles.

This morning, we came to a very small creek that was going to be our last water for 12 miles. As we were scooping the water into our bottles (it was pretty shallow), we could hear a cow a little ways off making a ton of weird noises. Soon the cow was coming down the trail towards us acting very strange. Once we realized it was a bull, we figured it was signaling us to get out of there before he got even more pissed off, so we grabbed our bottles and got ourselves out of his eye sight. Bulls always make us a bit nervous, so we like to give them as much space as possible.

It seemed like there must have recently been some trail construction in the area where we were hiking today, since our navigation app often didn’t match the marked trail in front of us. It also seemed like there was more trail geared to mountain bikers with the long, wide and frequent turns.

For most of the day we were largely going downhill. As we dropped in elevation, we started to see some different trees. By the end of the day, we were in Jeffrey pines, oaks and junipers. It was also quite hazy today. We figure that there is smoke from the wildfires in Colorado coming down here…we aren’t aware of any fires close by.

We are camped about 3,000 feet lower than last night, so we are hopeful it won’t be as cold tonight. Regardless, SweetPea is going to be looking for some “feet warmer” packets at the store tomorrow so she can be prepared for the next super cold night.

The post CDT Day 83 – Harris Bear Spring appeared first on Long Distance Hiker.

No Comments on CDT Day 83 – Harris Bear Spring

CDT Day 82 – Rock Creek

Date: 9/17/20

Daily Miles: 24

Total Miles: 1494

Last night turned out to be quite cold. We were camped in a slight valley and that made a big difference. It was just a cold morning in general, though. We had all of our layers on for over an hour before we started to warm up.

Within a mile and a half of starting our day, we came to our first water source. We were hoping that a faucet in a campground was turned on, but sadly it wasn’t, so we had to take water from a lake. After we filtered out the green floaty bits with our bandana it wasn’t too bad.

Several hours into our day, we came across a guy who was parked off a forest road, just waiting for his dad, Tarten, who is section hiking the CDT. This guy, Justin, has been supporting his dad in a Jeep over the past two months as Tarten hiked 1,000 miles of the CDT. Tarten is pretty impressive, getting into long distance backpacking at age 64. Since then he has thru-hiked the PCT and the AT, and is now section hiking the CDT at the ag..

Date: 9/17/20

Daily Miles: 24

Total Miles: 1494

Last night turned out to be quite cold. We were camped in a slight valley and that made a big difference. It was just a cold morning in general, though. We had all of our layers on for over an hour before we started to warm up.

Within a mile and a half of starting our day, we came to our first water source. We were hoping that a faucet in a campground was turned on, but sadly it wasn’t, so we had to take water from a lake. After we filtered out the green floaty bits with our bandana it wasn’t too bad.

Several hours into our day, we came across a guy who was parked off a forest road, just waiting for his dad, Tarten, who is section hiking the CDT. This guy, Justin, has been supporting his dad in a Jeep over the past two months as Tarten hiked 1,000 miles of the CDT. Tarten is pretty impressive, getting into long distance backpacking at age 64. Since then he has thru-hiked the PCT and the AT, and is now section hiking the CDT at the age of 71. We can only hope to still be hiking 1,000 miles when we are his age.

Justin gave us sodas and we chatted with him for about an hour. He had outfitted his Jeep really well for his summer of supporting his dad. He gave us a tour of his setup, including the solar power which he uses to power a small refrigerator as well as being able to charge their electronic devices. It was all really interesting.

As we were talking, two hunters and their guide came by and we chatted with them as well. They were coming from Miami, FL which we thought was really cool for them to make such a big trip out to NM. We haven’t met any hunters from Miami before. They were pretty interested in our CDT hike as well.

After a very enjoyable break, we decided we better keep moving down the trail. The day had turned into perfect temperatures and we had blue skies again. So far, hiking in NM has been really enjoyable.

Beardoh was feeling pretty hungry today so we stopped for lunch at 11:30am. As we were packing up to keep walking after lunch, we saw Tarten coming down the trail towards us. We ended up talking with him for awhile as well. He had such a positive attitude and zest for life, it was really fun to talk with him.

The rest of the day felt like a gradual climb. We were back over 10,000 feet by the end of the day. The forests seem to be a mixture of aspen and pine trees. Some of the aspen are starting to turn yellow, so there is a nice pop of color.

After dinner, we were walking mostly along a wide shallow valley that is lined with trees on both sides. We really enjoy that landscape to walk through.

We are camped in the valley tonight. The way our miles worked out, there wasn’t really a way to avoid it. We are expecting it to be cool, so we have prepared ourselves by having extra layers handy to put on during the night if we get too cold.

The post CDT Day 82 – Rock Creek appeared first on Long Distance Hiker.

No Comments on CDT Day 82 – Rock Creek

CDT Day 80 – Into New Mexico

Date: 9/15/20

Daily Miles: 17

Total Miles: 1447

Yesterday we finished up our drive south to Santa Fe and started our entirely too long journey on NM public transit to Chama. We spent about two hours actually on the buses riding and over five hours waiting for the various buses. We finally made it to Chama at 7:30pm as it was getting dark and we were exhausted.

We lucked out and got the last room at the motel in town. Someone had just cancelled their reservation, so we were able to get the room. We picked up salads at Subway, ate them while watching an episode of Shameless, and then zonked our for the night.

We decided that we wanted a more relaxing morning today, after the tiring past two days. We slept until 7am, sorted our food, bought a few more things at the grocery store and then waited for our ride. We had been in contact with a local trail angel who was going to give us a ride to the trail at 10:00am.

We were surprised to learn that the winter storm we had experienced in W..

Date: 9/15/20

Daily Miles: 17

Total Miles: 1447

Yesterday we finished up our drive south to Santa Fe and started our entirely too long journey on NM public transit to Chama. We spent about two hours actually on the buses riding and over five hours waiting for the various buses. We finally made it to Chama at 7:30pm as it was getting dark and we were exhausted.

We lucked out and got the last room at the motel in town. Someone had just cancelled their reservation, so we were able to get the room. We picked up salads at Subway, ate them while watching an episode of Shameless, and then zonked our for the night.

We decided that we wanted a more relaxing morning today, after the tiring past two days. We slept until 7am, sorted our food, bought a few more things at the grocery store and then waited for our ride. We had been in contact with a local trail angel who was going to give us a ride to the trail at 10:00am.

We were surprised to learn that the winter storm we had experienced in WY had been felt as far south as Chama. In fact, the town itself had gotten 6-8” of snow last Tuesday…and the mountains where the CDT crosses got even more. We hadn’t really expected to be hiking in more snow down here, but that seemed to be the situation.

Our Trail Angel, Marc, was right on time and brought us up to Cumbres Pass where we could continue our trek south. It was fun chatting with Marc and learning about the adobe home he is restoring.

We got on the trail at 10:30am and were walking in snow immediately. Some parts had melted already, but the areas in the shade still had snow. Other folks had already been on the trail, so we were just able to follow their footsteps.

The day was really beautiful. We had perfect temperatures and bright blue skies. We were instantly reminded of the great views in this area. We haven’t had much for big views lately, and we were happy to be back in southern Colorado.

We didn’t stay in Colorado long…in less than three miles we made it to the CO/NM border. At the border, there was a group of Americorps folks working on the border sign, which had fallen over last fall.

One of the guys in the group recognized us from our blog. He had checked out our information on the Grand Enchantment Trail before hiking a section of it last year. It is nice to know that we can pass along info that may be helpful to other hikers. We have certainly benefitted from reading other hikers’ blogs in the past.

Shortly after we left the border, the footprints of other hikers stopped. We hadn’t expected to be breaking trail in the snow here. Given the fact that the snow had fallen a solid week ago, we were amazed that no one had been out here this past week. It seems like we can rule out any CDT hikers being a week or less ahead of us. The only prints we saw at that point were from deer and elk…we even saw a set of bear prints in the snow.

The walking was a bit slow-going while we were breaking trail. We were walking through anywhere from one to six inches of snow. Not a ton of snow, but it was slippery. It seemed like this area got more snow than up in WY, but didn’t get the strong winds, as we didn’t encounter any new dead falls.

We got a few reprieves from the snow with some walking on dirt roads that were snow-free. And by late afternoon, we were walking in open areas where all the snow had melted. It was a bit muddy from the snowmelt, but we were happy not to be walking in the snow.

We decided to walk a bit later than normal since we got a late start and we are on a bit of a deadline with picking up our next resupply. We finally stopped to camp at 7:20pm, just as it was getting dark. We put up our hammocks quickly and are in bed by 8:00pm.

Back on trail at Cumbres Pass
Back on trail at Cumbres Pass
Americorps crew reinstalling sign post at CO/NM border
Americorps crew reinstalling sign post at CO/NM border
Bear, we believe
Bear, we believe
Meadows at 10,200 feet elevation
Meadows at 10,200 feet elevation

The post CDT Day 80 – Into New Mexico appeared first on Long Distance Hiker.

No Comments on CDT Day 80 – Into New Mexico

Heathlands Sculpture Trail

When is a Trail not a Trail? When it is the Heathlands Sculpture Trail! More a Project than a Trail, the Heathlands Sculpture Trail aims is to link seven heathland sites in the South Downs National Park though the use of unique sculptures telling the story of the history, wildlife, and people of each site. … Continue reading Heathlands Sculpture Trail

When is a Trail not a Trail? When it is the Heathlands Sculpture Trail! More a Project than a Trail, the Heathlands Sculpture Trail aims is to link seven heathland sites in the South Downs National Park though the use of unique sculptures telling the story of the history, wildlife, and people of each site. …

Continue reading Heathlands Sculpture Trail

No Comments on Heathlands Sculpture Trail

Kennebec Highlands: Round Top via Round Top Trail (Maine)

Follow me on Facebook!
Round Top Trail is a modest peak in the Kennebec Highlands/Belgrade Lakes Region. It offers a decent challenge in varied terrain.

The first section of trail is steep, but quickly you start to circumnavigate aimlessly and wonder if you're going the right way. You eventually come to a junction where you can make a loop of the peak using the Kennebec Highlands Trail. This is a beautiful area on an old logging type road that climbs gently to the next junction, turning hard left to head up the mountain.

The trail again climbs steeply up, with great views of the lakes on the way up to the summit spur.

The summit spur doesn't actually lead to the summit. I'm not quite sure where the true summit is. But the viewpoint wasn't anything particularly spectacular.

Overall, I would say this is a fun hike with great terrain, but the views aren't my favorite in the world.

Total Time: 55 minsTotal Distance: ~4.36 miles (Garmin Fenix 5x Plus)Total Elev..

Follow me on Facebook!
Round Top Trail is a modest peak in the Kennebec Highlands/Belgrade Lakes Region. It offers a decent challenge in varied terrain.

The first section of trail is steep, but quickly you start to circumnavigate aimlessly and wonder if you're going the right way. You eventually come to a junction where you can make a loop of the peak using the Kennebec Highlands Trail. This is a beautiful area on an old logging type road that climbs gently to the next junction, turning hard left to head up the mountain.




The trail again climbs steeply up, with great views of the lakes on the way up to the summit spur.



The summit spur doesn't actually lead to the summit. I'm not quite sure where the true summit is. But the viewpoint wasn't anything particularly spectacular.



Overall, I would say this is a fun hike with great terrain, but the views aren't my favorite in the world.

Total Time: 55 minsTotal Distance: ~4.36 miles (Garmin Fenix 5x Plus)Total Elevation Gain: ~941 vertical gain

No Comments on Kennebec Highlands: Round Top via Round Top Trail (Maine)

final post on this blog

While this is the final post on this blog, I am not giving up on blogging. When my internet provider performed a migration, it left me unable to access this blog on my main computer to post new stories. Since the end of August I have been posting from another device and it has become time consuming and confusing. To get back to blogging being an easy, enjoyable experience, I built another blog which I am trying to keep similar to the old one. At this point the basics are in place and it will be a work in progress over the next little while. The old blog will remain as a source of information. It will be my go to place when I want to relive an adventure. Commenting will be turned off on the old blog yet it will be open on the new site.
I hope this works and goes as planned.
Going forward, you can follow me at: still making waves on top of the world

While this is the final post on this blog, I am not giving up on blogging. When my internet provider performed a migration, it left me unable to access this blog on my main computer to post new stories. Since the end of August I have been posting from another device and it has become time consuming and confusing. To get back to blogging being an easy, enjoyable experience, I built another blog which I am trying to keep similar to the old one. At this point the basics are in place and it will be a work in progress over the next little while. The old blog will remain as a source of information. It will be my go to place when I want to relive an adventure. Commenting will be turned off on the old blog yet it will be open on the new site.
I hope this works and goes as planned.
Going forward, you can follow me at: still making waves on top of the world

No Comments on final post on this blog

Type on the field below and hit Enter/Return to search