Author: Hike Mike

Edworthy Park – Calgary – Hiking Alberta

Edworthy Park offers excellent hiking opportunities featuring dramatic views and fascinating history.

Edworthy Park is located in central SW Calgary. For this excellent inner-city hike access can be achieved by vehicle via Sarcee Trail, then east on Bow Trail, to well-signed turns for Edworthy Park and north on 45th Street noting the speed-reduced zone past Wildwood School.
A left turn onto Spruce Drive heads west past cell phone towers at Woodcliff United Church to the right turn onto narrow, twisting road descending slowly and carefully past hikers and cyclists to a sweeping left turn near the bottom for angled parking on the approach to a restricted-access, private dwelling adjacent to the expansive Edworthy Park picnic and playground area.
Access can also be achieved by parking on the north side of the Bow River near the bottom of Shaganappi Trail and walking south across the Harry Boothman Bridge (Edworthy Bridge) over the Bow River near Angel's Cappuccino and Ice Cream into..

Edworthy Park offers excellent hiking opportunities featuring dramatic views and fascinating history.

Hike Edworthy Park Bowdale Crescent, Calgary, Alberta, Canada #hiking

Edworthy Park is located in central SW Calgary. For this excellent inner-city hike access can be achieved by vehicle via Sarcee Trail, then east on Bow Trail, to well-signed turns for Edworthy Park and north on 45th Street noting the speed-reduced zone past Wildwood School.

A left turn onto Spruce Drive heads west past cell phone towers at Woodcliff United Church to the right turn onto narrow, twisting road descending slowly and carefully past hikers and cyclists to a sweeping left turn near the bottom for angled parking on the approach to a restricted-access, private dwelling adjacent to the expansive Edworthy Park picnic and playground area.

Access can also be achieved by parking on the north side of the Bow River near the bottom of Shaganappi Trail and walking south across the Harry Boothman Bridge (Edworthy Bridge) over the Bow River near Angel's Cappuccino and Ice Cream into and through Edworthy Park, past the railway tracks on the south side and through the picnic area/playground to the trail-head at the southwest corner.

From the angled parking area, a short walk to the end of the road reveals a cul-de-sac with well-signed, gated and restricted access road continuing to a private property adjacent to an informal, public, gravel trail heading uphill near a tiny stream.

The well-trodden trail gains modest elevation over a short, wooden platform bridge where a mirror pond subdues the progress of more aggressive drainage with pooling water beneath a large, mysterious and colorful drum laying on its side.

Two trail junctions offer uphill access to the dog walking park near the top of this Broadcast Hill slope following a robust and extended ascent while the lateral trail through forest proceeds west above an older and private dwelling below.

The main structure appears to be an old heritage dwelling with well-weathered, wooden roofing shingles whose presence will soon be hidden by new spring foliage on dense surrounding forest.

The private home oversees large groomed fields framed by the privacy of dense surrounding shrubbery.

A short trail branch to the right provides a viewpoint with a memorial bench overseeing the heritage dwelling below as well as long views across the swelling, blue-green Bow River to the colorful Alberta Children's Hospital and beyond to the Calgary Downtown skyline.

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Continuing west, the hike navigates a large patch of, soon to be gone, winter ice and introduces a bit of off-trail adventure. As this mildly undulating trail section descends gently beneath power lines towards the railroad tracks and Bow River level, a triangular intersection features

1) an important historical feature,

2) a trail returning east along the railway tracks and

3) today's choice to swing left on old, gravel road heading west over ground showing evidence of crushed red brick from pioneer times.

Hike Edworthy Park Bowdale Crescent, Calgary, Alberta, Canada #hikingHike Edworthy Park Bowdale Crescent, Calgary, Alberta, Canada #hikingHike Edworthy Park Bowdale Crescent, Calgary, Alberta, Canada #hikingHike Edworthy Park Bowdale Crescent, Calgary, Alberta, Canada #hiking

The old road heading west parallels railroad track for a short distance before single-track trail eases left and gains gentle elevation into forest. Old fencing and the occasional trail-side oddity stands testament to past industrial activity.

Developing spring foliage permits surrounding views as undulating trail crosses runoff creeks in the valleys between high points providing sweeping city views across Shouldice Park to the Calgary Skyline in the far distance.

Occasional patches of open landscaped terrain on the left reveal large, isolated private dwellings perched above and surrounded by forest on these lower slopes of Broadcast Hill.

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Following an excellent forest section featuring a stand of Douglas Fir, the trail opens to grassland beside an old post fence with remnants of historic telegraph cables still clinging to intact glass insulators from more comfortable, and less frantic, eras past.

Dirt trail descends gracefully to bypass a larger drainage for a short walk, on comfortable margin, to adjacent rail lines before a short return ascent to trail along fence line beneath telegraph line continues west above the railroad tracks.

An explosion of subtle lavender crocus poke through tall wheat-colored grassland. Sweeping vistas across grassland and over the Bow River reveal recreational facilities and the popular dog park south from the river-adjacent picnic area.

Shouldice Aquatic Centre resides nearthe sharp bend in the Bow River whichhosts the TransCanada Highway traffic bridge over the Bow River and the historic John Hextall Bridge beyond in Montgomery near the demarcation line between the communities of Montgomery and Bowness.

The continuing trail stretches straight towards the small community of Bowdale, encased by the sweeping exit from Sarcee Trail to the TransCanada Highway as the roar and rumble of a passing freight train interrupts the serenity and shakes surrounding ground.

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On the far side of the river, secluded parkland compressed between Shouldice Athletic Park and the beautiful Bow River hosts the daily dog walkers entertaining their partners with sticks thrown into the river for immediate and enthusiastic retrieval.

Although continuing informal trail complex provides the opportunity to walk the short distance home, the car remaining at Edworthy Park invites a return on trail initially taken predominantly through field and forest above the railway line.

Familiar features present new perspectives as trail eases through lush evergreen forest occasionally dipping into gullies still servicing winter thaw. Along the way, subtle side trails meander into short sections of moss-covered rock alcoves which undoubtedly entertain those seeking fantasy and solitude.

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Hike Edworthy Park Bowdale Crescent, Calgary, Alberta, Canada #hikingHike Edworthy Park Bowdale Crescent, Calgary, Alberta, Canada #hiking

Back at the triangular intersection, the opportunity presents itself to become more familiar with the Brickburn historical presence. A historical marker tells the story. What began as a quarry and modest brick plant became the Calgary Presssed Brick and Sandstone Company which serviced burgeoning city development between 1905 and 1931.

Calgary's original City Hall used sandstone blocks from this quarry. Many Calgary brick buildings constructed from the plant's product include the Mewata Armory.

At it's height of activity, the original facility was churning out 80,000 bricks per day and occupied nearly 100 people. The complex at this location hosted dormitories, a small school, a post office, and a small church. Much of the brick was shipped by rail to other cities. Some of these bricks are at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Alberta.

Touring the flat terrain between stands of trees reveals little evidence of prior occupation beyond the occasional depression in the ground which may or not indicate previous industrial activity.

A mound of brick debris at the west end, behind the corner signage, has largely grown over or has been consumed by nature and subsequent development over time.

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Return to Edworthy Park is achieved via old and heavily traveled road between the Brickburn archival marker and the railway tracks.

Passing private land adjacent to the well treed, private dwelling is protected by high chain link fence, shrubbery and forest augmented by many 'No Trespassing' signs justifiably pleading for privacy from surrounding public land and traffic.

A loop around the end of the chain link fence adjacent to the railroad line enters the well-appointed playground and group picnic area for easy return to angle parking near the trail-head.

There is huge hiking potential within Calgary and surrounding communities for physical conditioning opportunity and gear acclimatization prior to tackling trail in the mountains and gaining elevation as the snow line recedes.

Hike Edworthy Park Bowdale Crescent, Calgary, Alberta, Canada #hiking

The nearby Douglas Fir Trail, a short distance east in Edworthy Park, which was heavily damaged by water runoff and closed for safety and repair, has now reopened and is another excellent inner-city hiking alternative featuring trees marginally older than I am.

Photographs for this Calgary inner-city hike were captured on informal trail between Edworthy Park and Bowdale Crescent, along the railway line and the Bow River on Tuesday, May 8, 2018 following a lengthy and challenging 2017/2018 winter season.

The 2018/2019 winter season is making last year look better.

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Rowley – Ghost Town – Drumheller – Hiking Alberta

Rowley is an easy access, authentic, rural ghost town north of Drumheller, Alberta, Canada.

Sam's Cafe became Sam's Saloon
Rowley is a short, ¾ hour drive through predominantly rolling prairie north from Drumheller, Alberta on Hwy 9 which morphs into Hwy 56. About 20 KM north, look for the clearly signed left turn from Hwy 56 into Rowley, on about 5 KM of good, gravel road, into the small, largely abandoned town. Aim for the three large grain elevators and find a convenient parking spot.
Ken, Dianna and I are here mid week and the tiny town in the middle of nowhere is quiet and civilized. Weekends are likely to be busier and there is a communal pizza night on one Saturday each month which is purportedly and enthusiastically well attended in a party atmosphere.
Rowley was a most active community in the 1910 through 1920 period. The Great Depression left no town untouched. Within the 1980's the town's population was well on its way towards a single digit population. ..

Rowley is an easy access, authentic, rural ghost town north of Drumheller, Alberta, Canada.

Rowley, Ghost Town, Drumheller, Alberta, Canada

Sam's Cafe became Sam's Saloon

Rowley is a short, ¾ hour drive through predominantly rolling prairie north from Drumheller, Alberta on Hwy 9 which morphs into Hwy 56. About 20 KM north, look for the clearly signed left turn from Hwy 56 into Rowley, on about 5 KM of good, gravel road, into the small, largely abandoned town. Aim for the three large grain elevators and find a convenient parking spot.

Ken, Dianna and I are here mid week and the tiny town in the middle of nowhere is quiet and civilized. Weekends are likely to be busier and there is a communal pizza night on one Saturday each month which is purportedly and enthusiastically well attended in a party atmosphere.

Rowley was a most active community in the 1910 through 1920 period. The Great Depression left no town untouched. Within the 1980's the town's population was well on its way towards a single digit population. The history is interesting.

Train Station at Rowley, Ghost Town, Drumheller, Alberta, Canada

When the final passenger train passed through Rowley in 1999, income from tourist passengers ended and the picturesque town dwindled from a population of about 500 in the 1920's to the approximately 8 current residents with nearly all buildings vacated and in an advanced state of decay.

After parking in front of the Community Center under the shade of a tree, our, self-managed tour, ramble and investigation begins across from the railway box car at the old and authentic 1920's Rowley train station.

Pick the route you like the best.

Rowley, Ghost Town, Drumheller, Alberta, CanadaRowley, Ghost Town, Drumheller, Alberta, CanadaRowley, Ghost Town, Drumheller, Alberta, CanadaRowley, Ghost Town, Drumheller, Alberta, CanadaRowley, Ghost Town, Drumheller, Alberta, Canada

Rowley, Ghost Town, Drumheller, Alberta, Canada

From the train station, our self-guided and spontaneous tour rambles around and past restored train cars including a bright yellow caboose, the very large and restored grain elevators, and several derelict buildings overgrown with vegetation.

There is an opportunity to get up close and personal with abandoned heritage buildings prior to circling around to the main street where historic storefronts lend credence to the services provided in the heritage town.

When the last passenger train pulled through here in 1999 the town's economic fate was determined by cessation of passenger traffic. Population peaked around 500 people in the 1920's and gradually declined to non-sustainable by the mid 1970's.

Local residents decided to fix up the the old town site as a tourist attraction. This initiative attracted a successful Canadian movie production as the background for several movies including 'Bye Bye Blues'.

When the last passenger train passed through in 1999, loss of visitor income sealed the economic fate of the old town.

Heritage stores have been refurbished and maintenance is actively ongoing as features are expanded. Descriptive text is featured to embellish the history of each structure.

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Some of the oldest structures are moving past constructive maintenance but there presence creates an eery reflection of better times long past. It is easy to imagine the pioneers toiling to maintain their farms.

Behind an overgrown and crumbling old farmhouse a moose is feeding in the large pond to the south. The place is far more alive than it appears.

Rowley, Ghost Town, Drumheller, Alberta, Canada

Wandering becomes disorganized as newly revealed attractions beckon and route organization becomes impulsively dynamic.

Rowley, Ghost Town, Drumheller, Alberta, CanadaRowley, Ghost Town, Drumheller, Alberta, CanadaRowley, Ghost Town, Drumheller, Alberta, CanadaRowley, Ghost Town, Drumheller, Alberta, Canada

The old schoolhouse stands firm within plenty of playground space and archival farming machines punctuate the landscape.

The old hospital on the main drag is in need of restoration and work currently underway on the adjacent United Church hints at the potential achievable.

Rowley, Ghost Town, Drumheller, Alberta, CanadaRowley, Ghost Town, Drumheller, Alberta, CanadaRowley, Ghost Town, Drumheller, Alberta, CanadaRowley, Ghost Town, Drumheller, Alberta, Canada

This is a fascinating place. Rowley is not very big but there is a hike here to view and learn from the historical structures and long abandoned buildings being preserved for future generations. The effort seems well organized and the experience is uplifting.

Where we are going is often easier to determine when then opportunity presents itself to study where we have been.

This fascinating and rewarding visit to Rowley, about 40 KM (25 miles) north from Drumheller was enjoyed on the morning of May 29, 2019.

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Horseshoe Canyon – Drumheller – Hiking Alberta

Horseshoe Canyon is clearly signed about 18 KM south-west on the Highway 9 access into Drumheller, Alberta.

This bizarre and incredibly beautiful badlands feature punctuates seemingly limitless stretches of rolling and relatively flat, monotonous prairie landscape. Horseshoe Canyon is a unique, beautiful and forever memorable hiking experience.
Clearly signed Horeshoe Canyon is a turn west to short arrival at parking for a fenced overview hosting large klinkers, informative signage, a covered picnic table feature and viewing platforms over thousands of acres of spectacular badlands erosion.
On this Wednesday, we have the entire facility to ourselves. Horseshoe Canyon is always crowded and busy on fair weather, Spring, Summer and Autumn weekends.
Access to the bottom of the canyon is via a paved segment of path east around fencing to the gravel ramp which can be augmented by wide, wooden stairs for descent.
The descent leads into the fascinating features unique to badlands. Winding tra..

Horseshoe Canyon is clearly signed about 18 KM south-west on the Highway 9 access into Drumheller, Alberta.

Horseshoe Canyon, Drumheller, Alberta, Canada

This bizarre and incredibly beautiful badlands feature punctuates seemingly limitless stretches of rolling and relatively flat, monotonous prairie landscape. Horseshoe Canyon is a unique, beautiful and forever memorable hiking experience.

Clearly signed Horeshoe Canyon is a turn west to short arrival at parking for a fenced overview hosting large klinkers, informative signage, a covered picnic table feature and viewing platforms over thousands of acres of spectacular badlands erosion.

On this Wednesday, we have the entire facility to ourselves. Horseshoe Canyon is always crowded and busy on fair weather, Spring, Summer and Autumn weekends.

Access to the bottom of the canyon is via a paved segment of path east around fencing to the gravel ramp which can be augmented by wide, wooden stairs for descent.

The descent leads into the fascinating features unique to badlands. Winding trails at the bottom can be accessed from the wide gravel pathway reaching across the flat desert floor. The pending adventure should be limited only by personal experience, proper gear and common sense. Carry plenty of water.

Horseshoe Canyon, Drumheller, Alberta, CanadaHorseshoe Canyon, Drumheller, Alberta, CanadaHorseshoe Canyon, Drumheller, Alberta, CanadaHorseshoe Canyon, Drumheller, Alberta, Canada

Arrival at floor level of Horseshoe Canyon is entry into a bizarre netherworld of ancient times on our planet prior to human habitation.

The short section of fresh gravel wide trail will perform better when more foot traffic packs it down. This new area is obviously under construction and fresh new trails will allow old traffic-beaten trails to recover.

At the end of new gravel, Ken, Dianna and I decide to explore off-trail. What could possibly go wrong? Against the face of far canyon walls, the terrain is wild, fresh and real.

Horseshoe Canyon, Drumheller, Alberta, CanadaHorseshoe Canyon, Drumheller, Alberta, Canada

Pathways hiked are game trails and mostly dry stream beds. Sheltered wet sections on this day are mercifully brief and similar to hiking through glue. Sturdy boots pick up the mud and thigh muscles become curious about highly modified walking dynamics.

Dense brush often determines routing as our adventure heads predominantly west and south. Following an hour of fascinating progress through and past several canyon obstacles, spontaneous routing continues along the fascinating and challenging terrain. This is a uniquely beautiful place.

Horseshoe Canyon, Drumheller, Alberta, CanadaHorseshoe Canyon, Drumheller, Alberta, CanadaHorseshoe Canyon, Drumheller, Alberta, CanadaHorseshoe Canyon, Drumheller, Alberta, CanadaHorseshoe Canyon, Drumheller, Alberta, Canada

Animal, avian and reptile activity is visually present on predominantly, powder-dry ground. Generally, clear areas provide sensible passage. Frequently, progress is challenging through narrow fissures and dense desert brush.

The surrounding and total saturation in completely foreign terrain raises the threshold of awareness. The smallest features are examined carefully as the senses struggle to accept and process large volumes of new information.

Stark foreign surroundings host strange new plants combined with unique weathered shapes and forms, each a weathered portrait unfolding perpetually over thousands of years for observation in this unique and fascinating moment.

Horseshoe Canyon, Drumheller, Alberta, CanadaHorseshoe Canyon, Drumheller, Alberta, Canada

In the interest of time, and potential preservation of life within building and oppressive desert heat, the collective decision is to backtrack with a directional objective for location of a more gentle return trail on path used by people.

Heading towards the east wall on random trail soon intercepts a clear, flat and forgiving human trail. Longer views can be more fully absorbed and better appreciated when attention is less compromised by trail complexity.

Horseshoe Canyon, Drumheller, Alberta, CanadaHorseshoe Canyon, Drumheller, Alberta, CanadaHorseshoe Canyon, Drumheller, Alberta, CanadaHorseshoe Canyon, Drumheller, Alberta, Canada

Soon, one of the viewing platforms from the surface park complex peeks into view on the edge of the horizon. We are now clearly returning to our start point and within a short time the newly laid gravel trail is intersected for return to canyon top.

It is a unique privilege to have the bottom of this colorful canyon entirely to ourselves.

Horseshoe Canyon, Drumheller, Alberta, CanadaHorseshoe Canyon, Drumheller, Alberta, CanadaHorseshoe Canyon, Drumheller, Alberta, Canada

Our hike in Horseshoe Canyon provides a fascinating glance into the nature of prehistoric times.

Carrying extra water is very important, particularly for children and elderly people. Drinking the water is more important than carrying the water and the load will be reduced in the process.

This special hike in Horseshoe Canyon, south-west from Drumheller, occurred the afternoon of Wednesday May 29, 2019. The return drive to Calgary requires an hour and a half drive predominantly through prairie on good paved road.

This special hiking day included an early morning drive from Calgary to cross the Red Deer River on the Bleriot Ferry for sightseeing at the Ghost Town of Rowley.

Lunch in the shade near the Suspension Bridge at Rosedale precludes brief hiking and exploration at the old, coal mining town of Wayne, Alberta.

Unique hiking at the Hoodoos Trail along Hwy 10 through East Coulee precludes this fascinating hiking adventure in Horseshoe Canyon SW of Drumheller. Grand memories are created.

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Hoodoos – Drumheller East Coulee – Hiking Aberta

Hoodoos in the East Coulee are a perennial and unique attraction near Drumheller, Alberta, Canada.

The well preserved and fascinating erosion features at Hoodoos Trail in the East Coulee have long been a popular and magnetic attraction about a 20 minute, 25 KM drive SE of Drumheller. Stops along the way at the Suspension Bridge and/or the former mining community of Wayne near Rosedale will enhance and extend the length of the experience.
Expanded parking for the Hoodoos Trail remains crowded on weekends but is generally quieter on week days.
Ken, Dianna and I enjoy a packed lunch beneath shade trees at the historical and open-to-the-public Suspension Bridge at Rosedale prior to experiencing the short excursion across the Red Deer River.
A quick drive and walking tour of the Hamlet of Wayne, on the other (north) side of the highway from Rosedale, features multiple river crossings over mostly single lane bridges to visit to the historic Last Chance Saloon at the venerable RoseDeer Hotel..

Hoodoos in the East Coulee are a perennial and unique attraction near Drumheller, Alberta, Canada.

Hoodoos, East Coulee, Drumheller, Alberta, Canada

The well preserved and fascinating erosion features at Hoodoos Trail in the East Coulee have long been a popular and magnetic attraction about a 20 minute, 25 KM drive SE of Drumheller. Stops along the way at the Suspension Bridge and/or the former mining community of Wayne near Rosedale will enhance and extend the length of the experience.

Expanded parking for the Hoodoos Trail remains crowded on weekends but is generally quieter on week days.

Ken, Dianna and I enjoy a packed lunch beneath shade trees at the historical and open-to-the-public Suspension Bridge at Rosedale prior to experiencing the short excursion across the Red Deer River.

A quick drive and walking tour of the Hamlet of Wayne, on the other (north) side of the highway from Rosedale, features multiple river crossings over mostly single lane bridges to visit to the historic Last Chance Saloon at the venerable RoseDeer Hotel.

Potential future hiking opportunities are observed for a future visit into this once bustling, coal mining community.

Rosedeer Hotel, Last Chance Saloon, Wayne, Alberta, Canada

The easterly drive along Hwy 10 continues to parking at the signed and obvious Hoodoos location where weekday attendance is sparse. Main features have justifiably been protected and stairs have been installed to allow viewing with less long-term damage.

Additionally, the east section has been expanded to include further opportunity for observation, discovery and hiking enjoyment.

Hoodoos, East Coulee, Drumheller, Alberta, CanadaHoodoos, East Coulee, Drumheller, Alberta, CanadaHoodoos, East Coulee, Drumheller, Alberta, Canada

Views expand across the river valley with a small gain in elevation but the fascinating hoodoo formations beg for further exploration. Quality footwear with a good tread will increase safety and reduce risk. Terrain can be hazardous when the ground is wet.

The immersion in earth colors, combined with fascinating erosion features, challenging terrain and unique characteristics provide the fundamental ingredients for an exciting and rewarding adventure.

Hoodoos, East Coulee, Drumheller, Alberta, CanadaHoodoos, East Coulee, Drumheller, Alberta, CanadaHoodoos, East Coulee, Drumheller, Alberta, Canada

Fresh air and sunshine combine with an occasional breeze to mitigate the warmth.

Wandering around the periphery of the site, with unique features, allows quiet reflection and includes the potential to discover a fossil or evidence of long gone industrial activity.

Hoodoos, East Coulee, Drumheller, Alberta, CanadaHoodoos, East Coulee, Drumheller, Alberta, Canada

Debris from past hoodoo formations litter the ground where thousands of years of erosion have eventually dissolved the softer sandstone supporting columns. This unique and beautiful landscape is a perpetual dichotomy of change.

This scene serves as a reminder of grand memories from past adventures in the more prolific terrain of the American Southwest.

Hoodoos, East Coulee, Drumheller, Alberta, CanadaHoodoos, East Coulee, Drumheller, Alberta, Canada

Following this always rewarding tour of the Hoodoos, the drive back and through Drumheller is briefly interrupted for ice cream at the local Dairy Queen prior to travelling south and west for hiking in Horseshoe Canyon which must not to be confused with Horsethief Canyon which is further north past the Royal Tyrrell Museum along North Dinosaur Trail.

This short adventure at the Hoodoos Trail in the East Coulee near Drumheller, Alberta, Canada was enjoyed on Wednesday, May 29, 2019.

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Nora Tuckey’s Grove – Calgary – Hiking Alberta

Nora Tuckey's Grove is a quiet, peaceful alcove honoring a special woman who left a lasting impression in Calgary, Alberta.

Nora Tuckey left us too soon. A perpetual and memorable section of Sue Higgins Park in Calgary's south-east quadrant, bracketed between Deerfoot Trail and the Bow River at the east end of Southland Drive, pays lasting homage to her presence.
The park is open to everyone but particularly of interest to dog owners who can exercise their companions in large, fenced enclosures while unfettered pathway remains open to those who prefer walk alone or with friends along the Bow River.
Best positioned parking is achieved by entering the parking area at the east terminus of Southland Drive and parking in the large parking area as far west as possible where the 2009 BP Birthplace Tree Forest is clearly signed.
Bronze statues of Deux Chiens Assis (Two Dogs Seated) reside in the visible distance on a raised knoll adjacent to the BP Birthplace Forest.

Deux Chiens As..

Nora Tuckey's Grove is a quiet, peaceful alcove honoring a special woman who left a lasting impression in Calgary, Alberta.

Nora Tuckey's Grove, Sue Higgins Park, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Nora Tuckey left us too soon. A perpetual and memorable section of Sue Higgins Park in Calgary's south-east quadrant, bracketed between Deerfoot Trail and the Bow River at the east end of Southland Drive, pays lasting homage to her presence.

The park is open to everyone but particularly of interest to dog owners who can exercise their companions in large, fenced enclosures while unfettered pathway remains open to those who prefer walk alone or with friends along the Bow River.

Best positioned parking is achieved by entering the parking area at the east terminus of Southland Drive and parking in the large parking area as far west as possible where the 2009 BP Birthplace Tree Forest is clearly signed.

Bronze statues of Deux Chiens Assis (Two Dogs Seated) reside in the visible distance on a raised knoll adjacent to the BP Birthplace Forest.

Nora Tuckey's Grove, Sue Higgins Park, Calgary, Alberta, CanadaNora Tuckey's Grove, Sue Higgins Park, Calgary, Alberta, CanadaNora Tuckey's Grove, Sue Higgins Park, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Deux Chiens Assis, created by Sculptor Henri Alfred Marie Jaquemart in the late 1800s, were donated by the Devonian Foundation in 1978 to the City of Calgary Public Art Collection and subsequently displayed at Devonian Gardens prior to current presence near Nora Tuckey’s Grove adjacent to BP Forest.

French artist Henri Alfred Marie Jacquemart was born in Paris in 1824. and passed away in 1896. Henri studied at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris and exhibited at the Paris Salon from 1847 to 1879. Several of his works can be found in many museums world-wide including the Musee D’Orsay in Paris, France.

Nora Tuckey's Grove, Sue Higgins Park, Calgary, Alberta, CanadaNora Tuckey's Grove, Sue Higgins Park, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

The view from the attending bench faces east towards the Bow River. Directly behind the bench and slightly to the south-west is a plaque with a brief summary of Nora's personal story and the contribution she made to this park.

The placard guards an enclosed area of mature trees and half a dozen picnic tables. This is an excellent place to enjoy a picnic.

Nora Tuckey's Grove, Sue Higgins Park, Calgary, Alberta, CanadaNora Tuckey's Grove, Sue Higgins Park, Calgary, Alberta, CanadaNora Tuckey's Grove, Sue Higgins Park, Calgary, Alberta, CanadaNora Tuckey's Grove, Sue Higgins Park, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

The 2009 BP BirthPlace Forest is situated behind the grass-covered mound hosting Deux Chiens Assis. The dense forest hosts a broad range of tree types with three distinct trails covering the short north-south distance.

Noise from Deerfoot Trail is a constant and disturbing din which, in the future, could be substantially reduced with tall barriers, commonly used in the city for traffic noise reduction in communities, extending past the entire west boundary of Sue Higgins Park.

Nora Tuckey's Grove, Sue Higgins Park, Calgary, Alberta, CanadaNora Tuckey's Grove, Sue Higgins Park, Calgary, Alberta, CanadaNora Tuckey's Grove, Sue Higgins Park, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

The three short trails through the 2009 BP BirthPlace Forest are different surfaces best described as 1. good crushed stone, 2. good dirt and 3. pleasant rustic.

Each is a worthwhile short stroll which can be repeated in loops for additional distance and time or used as a prerequisite for further worthwhile adventure throughout Sue Higgins Park and beyond.

This park hosts a diverse variety of spectacular forest, land and water features combined with bridges and links to other parks and the incredible Calgary Pathway System.

Nora Tuckey's Grove, Sue Higgins Park, Calgary, Alberta, CanadaNora Tuckey's Grove, Sue Higgins Park, Calgary, Alberta, CanadaNora Tuckey's Grove, Sue Higgins Park, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Nora Tuckey's Grove, in Sue Higgins Park in SE Calgary and adjacent to the Bow River, provides an exceptionally peaceful experience in the fresh air on Monday, June 10, 2019.

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Door-Jamb Mountain – Kananaskis Country – Hiking Alberta

Door-Jamb Mountain is a precursor en route to the summit of Loder Peak in Bow Valley, Kananaskis Country, Alberta.

A much-needed, new parking area, with washrooms, is nearing completion on the north side of Highway 1A east of Exshaw, across from the Graymont Lime Plant, and between Jura Creek and the base of Door-Jamb Mountain.
Door-Jamb Mountain is a rugged hill with plenty of braided trail options sporting sharp rock potentially capable of destroying hiking gear, clothing and exposed body parts.
This little mountain is first in the chain north from Highway 1A sweeping north and east across Loder Peak, Goat Mountain and Yamnuska (Mount Laurie). The entire route contains scrambling components beyond hiking.
The primary intent for this day is to locate a cave in Jura Creek Canyon but parking in close proximity to Door-Jamb Mountain motivates a quick investigation since I may well be the last human being on the planet who has never set foot on this southern outlier of 2,088 m (6,850 ft..

Door-Jamb Mountain is a precursor en route to the summit of Loder Peak in Bow Valley, Kananaskis Country, Alberta.

Door-Jamb Mountain, Bow Valley, Kananaskis Country, Alberta, Canada

A much-needed, new parking area, with washrooms, is nearing completion on the north side of Highway 1A east of Exshaw, across from the Graymont Lime Plant, and between Jura Creek and the base of Door-Jamb Mountain.

Door-Jamb Mountain is a rugged hill with plenty of braided trail options sporting sharp rock potentially capable of destroying hiking gear, clothing and exposed body parts.

This little mountain is first in the chain north from Highway 1A sweeping north and east across Loder Peak, Goat Mountain and Yamnuska (Mount Laurie). The entire route contains scrambling components beyond hiking.

The primary intent for this day is to locate a cave in Jura Creek Canyon but parking in close proximity to Door-Jamb Mountain motivates a quick investigation since I may well be the last human being on the planet who has never set foot on this southern outlier of 2,088 m (6,850 ft) Loder Peak.

Mood enhancing Spring wildflowers are prolific within surrounding grassland and forest terrain.

Door-Jamb Mountain, Bow Valley, Kananaskis Country, Alberta, CanadaDoor-Jamb Mountain, Bow Valley, Kananaskis Country, Alberta, CanadaDoor-Jamb Mountain, Bow Valley, Kananaskis Country, Alberta, Canada

Loder Peak behind new parking and washroom with Door-Jamb Mountain in-between.

This day's potentially short, primary objective will attempt to locate a small cave in Jura Creek Canyon between Door-Jamb Mountain and Exshaw Mountain, so there is plenty of time to investigate the immediate area. Trail entrance to Door-Jamb Mountain consists of multiple opportunities around the south and west base of the very shallow mountain.

Each trail leads to a frustrating array of trail braids winding their way up multiple ascent routes on busy terrain littered with particularly obnoxious rock well-suited for the destruction of expensive hiking gear. Caution is always sensible.

Route finding, combined with fairly gentle elevation gain, rapidly reveals expansive vistas across the Bow Valley Corridor to familiar and distinctive mountains which provide a rush of memorable moments from past hiking missions.

Door-Jamb Mountain, Bow Valley, Kananaskis Country, Alberta, CanadaDoor-Jamb Mountain, Bow Valley, Kananaskis Country, Alberta, CanadaDoor-Jamb Mountain, Bow Valley, Kananaskis Country, Alberta, Canada

The distinctive shapes of Heart Mountain and Pigeon Mountain bracket massive Mount McGilivray along the south edge of the Bow Valley Corridor. In near distance, the Graymont Lime Plant, the Bow River complex and the Jura Creek water course dominate the expansive views.

The white stone framing Jura Creek shows adjacent development resulting from the 2013 major flooding event along the east base of Exshaw Mountain.

Door-Jamb Mountain, Bow Valley, Kananaskis Country, Alberta, CanadaDoor-Jamb Mountain, Bow Valley, Kananaskis Country, Alberta, CanadaDoor-Jamb Mountain, Bow Valley, Kananaskis Country, Alberta, Canada

Door-Jamb Mountain provides sufficient loft for spectacular vistas across the Bow Valley. Notice the change in initially clear sky as cloud rapidly forms up and begins to saturate the far horizon above the mountains. This rapid cloud build-up has the potential to substantially change the nature of the day.

No attempt is made to continue gaining elevation to the summit of Loder Peak. The scramble route north past the fault along Jura Creek seems like a more sensible approach to the summit of Loder Mountain. Many people choose to do the Door-Jamb Mountain, Loder Peak, down scramble to Jura Creek and return to parking via Jura Creek. Consult your hiking map and guide.

Door-Jamb Mountain, Bow Valley, Kananaskis Country, Alberta, CanadaDoor-Jamb Mountain, Bow Valley, Kananaskis Country, Alberta, Canada

The descent from Door-Jamb Mountain is cautious with some level of relief when flat, dirt trail through peripheral forest once again intersects with a matrix of old roads and trails near the new parking area.

Nearly any trail or old road tending west and north will eventually arrive at the fortified border of Jura Creek. Arrival at the entrance to Jura Creek Canyon is obvious on the hike along the banks of Jura Creek.

This brief excursion onto Door-Jamb Mountain occurs on Monday, June 17, 2019.

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Jura Creek Canyon Cave – Kananaskis Country – Hiking Alberta

Jura Creek Canyon is a popular hike in the Bow Valley component of Kananaskis Country, Alberta.

From the new parking area on the south side of Highway 1A across from the Graymont Plant, access to Jura Creek Canyon is achieved by hiking about a kilometer on a matrix of dirt roads and/or trail in a northwest inclination for eventual arrival at the raised, stony bank of Jura Creek.
On the approach into Jura Creek Canyon there are several safer spots to ramp down onto the expansive creek bed. The importance of quality, protective footwear (hiking boots) to avoid potential injury begins to become obvious.
Jura Creek lies between Door-Jamb Mountain / Loder Peak on the East and Exshaw Mountain to the West.
The entrance to Jura Creek Canyon is narrow and the tight canyon quickly becomes cluttered with large boulder debris deposited by the force of previous fast water and occasional flooding events.
On this late Spring day, there is just enough water running to require the use of lofty steppi..

Jura Creek Canyon is a popular hike in the Bow Valley component of Kananaskis Country, Alberta.

Jura Creek Canyon, Bow Valley, Kananaskis Country, Alberta, Canada

From the new parking area on the south side of Highway 1A across from the Graymont Plant, access to Jura Creek Canyon is achieved by hiking about a kilometer on a matrix of dirt roads and/or trail in a northwest inclination for eventual arrival at the raised, stony bank of Jura Creek.

On the approach into Jura Creek Canyon there are several safer spots to ramp down onto the expansive creek bed. The importance of quality, protective footwear (hiking boots) to avoid potential injury begins to become obvious.

Jura Creek lies between Door-Jamb Mountain / Loder Peak on the East and Exshaw Mountain to the West.

The entrance to Jura Creek Canyon is narrow and the tight canyon quickly becomes cluttered with large boulder debris deposited by the force of previous fast water and occasional flooding events.

On this late Spring day, there is just enough water running to require the use of lofty stepping stones or appropriately-placed logs to navigate around sections of water deeper than the height of the quality hiking boots required to reduce the real threat of injury.

Jura Creek Canyon, Bow Valley, Kananaskis Country, Alberta, CanadaJura Creek Canyon, Bow Valley, Kananaskis Country, Alberta, CanadaJura Creek Canyon, Bow Valley, Kananaskis Country, Alberta, CanadaJura Creek Canyon, Bow Valley, Kananaskis Country, Alberta, CanadaJura Creek Canyon, Bow Valley, Kananaskis Country, Alberta, Canada

A tiny evergreen tree, growing from an imperceptible tiny crack within a solid and very sharp rock ledge glows in a temporary sunbeam. As the canyon gradually gains elevation, the narrow portion of Jura Creek Canyon begins to gain width.

As canyon walls begin to widen and become less severely angled, the east (right) side of the canyon becomes a tapered slope of thin rock layers extending down to creek-side. Near the end of this short section, turning around and looking back down the canyon, and up to the left towards tall evergreen trees near the top of the slope, reveals the location of the small shallow cave.

Those who choose to scramble across and up to investigate, be advised it is a small cave without features. Followers will appreciate having it remain in its natural state.

Jura Creek Canyon, Bow Valley, Kananaskis Country, Alberta, CanadaJura Creek Canyon, Bow Valley, Kananaskis Country, Alberta, CanadaJura Creek Canyon, Bow Valley, Kananaskis Country, Alberta, Canada

Hiking a short distance further up-canyon reveals a rustic, dirt, ascent trail on the west side of Jura Creek Canyon. This trail is the High Water Trail which allows exit from, or entry into, Jura Creek when water flow through the Canyon is simply too high and dangerous to risk navigation in the narrow rocky section. If in doubt, always err on the side of caution.

In my personal experience, this bypass trail has never been necessary or employed, so this day presents an opportunity to experience hiking the bypass route. In the event of an unanticipated flash flooding event, this rustic alternative route may become very important and valuable.

Jura Creek Canyon, Bow Valley, Kananaskis Country, Alberta, CanadaJura Creek Canyon, Bow Valley, Kananaskis Country, Alberta, CanadaJura Creek Canyon, Bow Valley, Kananaskis Country, Alberta, Canada

The north end of the High Water Trail from Jura Creek to higher ground.

The forest route is a very pleasant, albeit short, hiking experience with rolling elevation at the base of Exshaw Mountain and isolation above Jura Creek Canyon. The trail exits the forest just past the entrance into Jura Creek Canyon onto the west rocky plateau above Jura Creek.

There are rugged trail ramps down to the creek bed, or the alternative taken this day is the opportunity to explore the west side of the plateau above the creek.

Jura Creek Canyon, Bow Valley, Kananaskis Country, Alberta, CanadaJura Creek Canyon, Bow Valley, Kananaskis Country, Alberta, CanadaJura Creek Canyon, Bow Valley, Kananaskis Country, Alberta, Canada

Many unique and interesting features reveal themselves along the hike south above the west side of Jura Creek hiking south towards Highway 1A. There is a large and distinctly beautiful, forested alcove near the base of Exshaw Mountain that is arbitrarily used for primitive, backcountry camping.

Cloud is building rapidly and becoming darker in the distance.

Jura Creek Canyon, Bow Valley, Kananaskis Country, Alberta, CanadaJura Creek Canyon, Bow Valley, Kananaskis Country, Alberta, CanadaJura Creek Canyon, Bow Valley, Kananaskis Country, Alberta, Canada

Looking back towards the entrance to Jura Creek Canyon reveals the profile and relative elevations of Door-Jamb Mountain in comparison to Loder Peak. This massive field of stone around the east base of Exshaw Mountain consumes many acres and this rock depository seems too well groomed to eliminate the possibility there may be future development at this site.

Jura Creek Canyon, Bow Valley, Kananaskis Country, Alberta, CanadaJura Creek Canyon, Bow Valley, Kananaskis Country, Alberta, CanadaJura Creek Canyon, Bow Valley, Kananaskis Country, Alberta, CanadaJura Creek Canyon, Bow Valley, Kananaskis Country, Alberta, Canada

The far (south) end of the rocky plain tapers down and narrows to forest borders adjacent to the sides of an old entry road. Along this short section of old road there is evidence it was once used as an illegal dumping site. Small, largely reclaimed piles of trash contain very old and rusty tin cans as well as shards from broken clay pottery.

The dirt road terminates at Highway 1A and turning left leads east along the Highway 1A apron to intersect with the location where Jura Creek flows through the concrete culvert passing beneath the highway to merge with the Bow River. The view north along Jura Creek towards the mountains provides a sense for the size and scale of the massive amount of water that may flow through here.

The two-hole culvert beneath the highway does not seem proportionate to handle the amount of water the riverbed might potentially deliver in flooding conditions.

Jura Creek Canyon, Bow Valley, Kananaskis Country, Alberta, CanadaJura Creek Canyon, Bow Valley, Kananaskis Country, Alberta, CanadaJura Creek Canyon, Bow Valley, Kananaskis Country, Alberta, Canada

Return to original parking is achieved on an old overgrown road resplendent with wildflowers and secret recreational spots. The largely reclaimed road, which parallels nearby overhead power lines, offers interesting recreational features among small alcoves of grassland complementing predominantly Spring forest. Each tree type sports its unique green and shiny, new leaves that display their uniquely individual green colors for this short period each year.

This excellent Jura Creek Canyon hike, exploration, discovery and ramble mission was completed on a very quiet, satisfying and relaxing Monday, June 17, 2019.

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Dale Hodges Park – Calgary Bowmont – Hiking Alberta

Dale Hodges Park is a unique experience in Bow River Park overlooking east Bowness in Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

Best public parking is arguably adjacent to Maranatha Church accessed by one-way 52nd Street NW off Home Road. Plan the route to avoid a frustrating start and be cautious for bicycle traffic in this area.
From parking, a short walk on paved trail leads directly to the circular overlook with outstanding views up and down the Bow River. Historic Hextall Bridge is below to the left backed by Calgary Olympic Park in the distance. Bow River water levels are running high as Spring runoff continues.

The obvious paved trail provides gentle slope descent to a small pedestrian bridge crossing over a stream outlet. Forest to the right with tall sandstone cliffs behind provide the backdrop for a fascinating and unique experience in engineered water, plant variety and visitor management. The park is located on the former site of the Klippert Concrete gravel pit.
Any access from the pave..

Dale Hodges Park is a unique experience in Bow River Park overlooking east Bowness in Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

Dale Hodges Park, Bow River Park, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Best public parking is arguably adjacent to Maranatha Church accessed by one-way 52nd Street NW off Home Road. Plan the route to avoid a frustrating start and be cautious for bicycle traffic in this area.

From parking, a short walk on paved trail leads directly to the circular overlook with outstanding views up and down the Bow River. Historic Hextall Bridge is below to the left backed by Calgary Olympic Park in the distance. Bow River water levels are running high as Spring runoff continues.

Dale Hodges Park, Bow River Park, Calgary, Alberta, CanadaDale Hodges Park, Bow River Park, Calgary, Alberta, CanadaDale Hodges Park, Bow River Park, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Dale Hodges Park, Bow River Park, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

The obvious paved trail provides gentle slope descent to a small pedestrian bridge crossing over a stream outlet. Forest to the right with tall sandstone cliffs behind provide the backdrop for a fascinating and unique experience in engineered water, plant variety and visitor management. The park is located on the former site of the Klippert Concrete gravel pit.

Any access from the paved river path will lead to well-documented passage throughout this unique and educational attraction created to manage the health of storm water entering the Bow River. As well as being purposely functional, this brilliantly conceived, small park is an amazing and worthwhile experience.

Jen and I enter the 40 hectare park near the Polishing Pond in the north-west section of the park with intent to view the large, circular and uniquely functional Nautilus Pond.

Dale Hodges Park, Bow River Park, Calgary, Alberta, CanadaDale Hodges Park, Bow River Park, Calgary, Alberta, CanadaDale Hodges Park, Bow River Park, Calgary, Alberta, CanadaDale Hodges Park, Bow River Park, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Several entrance points lead to the circuitous route through a variety of natural and person-made features. Interpretive plaques provide explanatory information for unique park features, purpose and function.

Only a few of many photographs can be included here. The experience deserves the time to wander, learn and absorb the plethora of images and explanations. This is a very functional, unique and fascinating place.

Dale Hodges Park, Bow River Park, Calgary, Alberta, CanadaDale Hodges Park, Bow River Park, Calgary, Alberta, CanadaDale Hodges Park, Bow River Park, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

The project has paired natural function within dramatic landscaping. Interpretive information is both interesting and educational within a water-cleansing, natural environment.

Dramatic sandstone cliffs provide impressive natural background and containment. From wooden walkways over water, specific wetland details can be examined up close. The detail is therapeutically captivating. Some of the ramps lead into water rendered deeper by Spring run-off.

Dale Hodges Park, Bow River Park, Calgary, Alberta, CanadaDale Hodges Park, Bow River Park, Calgary, Alberta, CanadaDale Hodges Park, Bow River Park, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Dale Hodges Park is definitely worth a visit when there is time to relax and absorb the natural ambiance.

This worthwhile foray into Dale Hodges Park was enjoyed with good friend Jen along the Bow River in NW Calgary, Alberta, Canada on Wednesday, July 3, 2019

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Manitou Springs Incline iPhone App

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Track your time, compete with others on the Manitou Springs Incline! HOW DO YOU RANK? • See how you rank amongst others. Track your time, date, altitude, and total hours on the Incline. TRACK YOUR FRIENDS • Follow your friends and see you you match up. • Compare your times against your friends and pros. Visit InclineApp.com to see how you rank.… Read more

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The post Manitou Springs Incline iPhone App appeared first on ColoradoHiking.org.

Track your time, compete with others on the Manitou Springs Incline! HOW DO YOU RANK? • See how you rank amongst others. Track your time, date, altitude, and total hours on the Incline. TRACK YOUR FRIENDS • Follow your friends and see you you match up. • Compare your times against your friends and pros. Visit InclineApp.com to see how you rank.… Read more

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Backpacking Gear I Should Have Bought Sooner! | Dan Becker

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