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Mount Nancy has been the elusive thorn in my side for the past several years. I attempted it fresh off a broken ankle sometime in early spring in 2015, and I had to turn around due to a combination of pain, getting lost, and post holing. Flash forward about four years, and a chance stay at a ski house in the summer led to me being a few miles down the road from the trailhead.

I spontaneously headed to the trail that morning and began my hike at 11 AM. Most say the hike is approximately 10 miles, but my GPS was closer to 9.5 (though it's been known to be quite off). The first several miles were difficult, as my head wasn't feeling it and I had already done this stretch before bailing last time.


But as soon as I reached the famed cascades, I had a second wind. The cascades are absolutely gorgeous, and are worth the hike on its own. A few other groups did just that, while I continued onward up the extremely steep slope.

After climbing quite a bit, you reach a flat section of bridges and follow this past the not so scenic Nancy Pond, and further to the stunning Norcross Pond. This particular day was exceptionally beautiful, as the clouds were just high enough to see the mountains in the valley below.


Now the real climb began. The herd path up to Mount Nancy is easy to follow. Once at the campsites, you turn right and then left at the fork, and begin the even steeper climb through brushy, narrow trails. I found myself on hands and knees on multiple occasions. To make matters worse, everything was soaked. Once I took in the above average views on top, I delicately cruised down the wet trail, holding on to trees the entire way down.




Once back at the pond, I began my run/jog downhill, making great timing, and finishing exactly 3.5 hours after beginning my hike. All in all, it was one of my favorite hikes in the Whites in recent memory despite its difficulty, and one you are sure to find solitude on.

Total Time: 3.5 hrsTotal Distance: ~9.5-10 milesTotal Elevation Gain: ~3050 vertical gain